Balls and Strikes: The Money Game in Professional Baseball

By Kenneth M. Jennings | Go to book overview

Four
Owners, Commissioners, Media, and Agents

Previous chapters have related baseball owners, commissioners, and the media to selected player-management incidents, such as the labor agreement negotiations that occur every several years. These off-field participants in the game of baseball actually exert a more pervasive influence than just at bargaining time. They affect the daily implementation of the labor agreement and other player-management concerns (drug abuse, for example) that occur between collective bargaining efforts.

This chapter discusses the owners, the commissioners, and the media in more detail and suggests how their various backgrounds or other general differences can affect player-management relationships. Agents--the final participant category discussed here--are not at all involved with negotiating collective bargaining agreements, although they often implement labor agreement provisions (free agency and salary arbitration, discussed in Chapter Eight) when they represent an individual player.


OWNERS AND OWNER DIFFERENCES

Some 65 years ago, Ring Lardner wrote that the baseball owner is burdened with high payrolls (as much as $65,000 per team in 1912) and other expenses and headaches. He concluded that the owner is "not going to the poorhouse. No, but the asylum is not so far away."1Lardner's comment suggests many of the problems that owners face and/or bring on themselves.

The previous three chapters have illustrated that the owners are not always unified. This has contributed to the union's ability to achieve large bargaining

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Balls and Strikes: The Money Game in Professional Baseball
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables and Exhibit vii
  • Preface ix
  • Part One Collective Bargaining Efforts 1
  • One Early Collective Bargaining 3
  • Two Marvin Miller and the Mlbpa 19
  • Three Collective Bargaining in the 1980s 41
  • Part Two Collective Bargaining Participants 71
  • Four Owners, Commissioners, Media, and Agents 73
  • Five Manager-Player Relationships 99
  • Six Player Pressures and Problems 125
  • Part Three Remaining Player-Management Issues 155
  • Seven The Race and Ethnic Issue 157
  • Eight Player Mobility and Salary Arbitration 181
  • Nine Salary Trends and Controversy 211
  • Notes 235
  • Selected Bibliography 263
  • Index 271
  • About the Author 275
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