Our Wonderland of Bureaucracy: A Study of the Growth of Bureaucracy in the Federal Government, and Its Destructive Effect upon the Constitution

By James M. Beck | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVI
BUREAUCRACY AND THE STATES

It is not by the consolidation or concentration of powers, but by their distribution, that good government is effected. Were not this country already divided into States, that distribution must be made that each might do for itself what concerns itself directly, and what it can so much better do than a distant authority. Every State is again divided into counties, each to take care of what lies within its local bounds; each county again into townships or wards, to manage minuter details, and every ward into farms, to be governed each by its individual proprietor. Were we directed from Washington when to sow and when to reap, we would soon want bread. It is by this partition of cares, descending in gradation from general to particular, that the mass of human affairs may be best managed for the good and prosperity of all."--THOMAS JEFFERSON.

WHILE our Constitution is nominally our chart of Government, yet, as previously shown, powers are daily exercised by our Government, for which no authority can be found in the Constitution and by these usurpations of power, the long arm of federal bureaucracy is slowly destroying the once proud consciousness of the States and invading their reserved fields of power.

During the Constitutional Convention, when the New Jersey and Virginia plans were under consideration, James Wilson stated on June 18:

"I do not apprehend that the General Government will swallow up that of the States--the States and their separate governments must be preserved--they will harmonize with the General Government."

On June 20 Mr. Madison said that:

"The history of the ancient confederacies proves that there has never been danger of the ruin of State governments by encroachments of the General Government, but the converse is

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