Chapter Thirty-four

NEVER BEFORE HAD the beauty of the world been so apparent. Never had life appeared so charged with potentialities for happiness. Yet through it all, like a strange dissonance in a lovely symphony, there existed everywhere in Europe harsh undertones of hatred and of fear. In the quiet valleys of Bavaria we heard the tramp of soldiers and the roar of artillery practice. We saw caisson after caisson, thundering from the factories of Silesia, loaded with the weapons of war. Munich was an insane blaze of bunting, a mad parade ground for strutting uniforms. In Vienna, gayest and gentlest of all cities, the opera continued, the bells of St. Stephen's still rang merrily, the festival of the new wine was bravely held, yet beneath, one sensed a feeling of dread, of fatalism amounting to despair. It was coming . . . coming. . . , an avalanche of horror and destruction. . . , a total war which would engulf and destroy millions of innocent people who wished no part of it, yet were powerless to prevent it. Why, oh why, in the name of suffering humanity, must this be?

In the winter of 1938 we rented a chalet for the season in the village of Arosa, seven thousand feet up, on the high slopes of the Tschuggen. Majestic white peaks, made rosy by the sunrise, the cheerful jingle of the horse-drawn sleighs, ski-wasser and hot coffee with double cream in the bright little café's of the village, the sweet smell of cows in the wooden straw-packed sheds, the ring of curling stones on ice, the spotless cleanliness, the wholesome goodness of Swiss food, the creak of new snow beneath one's feet, at night that exquisite tiredness after a long day's ski run to St. Moritz, the polished

-287-

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Adventures in Two Worlds
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Part One 1
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 13
  • Chapter Three 22
  • Chapter Four 28
  • Chapter Five 40
  • Chapter Six 50
  • Chapter Seven 59
  • Chapter Eight 68
  • Chapter Nine 75
  • Chapter Ten 82
  • Chapter Eleven 92
  • Chapter Twelve 102
  • Chapter Thirteen 112
  • Chapter Fourteen 123
  • Part Two 133
  • Chapter Fifteen 135
  • Chapter Sixteen 143
  • Chapter Seventeen 151
  • Chapter Eighteen 159
  • Chapter Nineteen 171
  • Part Three 181
  • Chapter Twenty 183
  • Chapter Twenty-One 189
  • Chapter Twenty-Two 200
  • Chapter Twenty-Three 208
  • Chapter Twenty-Four 214
  • Chapter Twenty-Five 222
  • Chapter Twenty-Six 230
  • Chapter Twenty-Seven 236
  • Chapter Twenty-Eight 244
  • Chapter Twenty-Nine 252
  • Part Four 257
  • Chapter Thirty 259
  • Chapter Thirty-One 266
  • Chapter Thirty-Two 275
  • Chapter Thirty-Three 279
  • Chapter Thirty-Four 287
  • Chapter Thirty-Five 292
  • Chapter Thirty-Six 297
  • Chapter Thirty-Seven 301
  • Chapter Thirty-Eight 309
  • Chapter Thirty-Nine 314
  • Chapter Forty 321
  • Chapter Forty-One 328
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