Chapter Thirty-nine

HOW OFTEN IN THESE afflicted countries had I seen the eyes of men turn in longing toward America! To those who had suffered much and lost much, who now, despite their striving, found themselves caught in a mesh of economic difficulties, smothered by levies and penal taxation, hampered by edicts and restrictions, embargoes and controls, it stood out as the last great bastion of individual liberty, a country solid and secure, where one might still find opportunity and incentive, a decent way of life, and above all the chance to advance by effort and ability, without the crushing intervention of that curse, that creeping paralysis of the modern age -- regimentation by the state. Especially to those parents who wished for their children a fair and favourable future did it seem attractive beyond all other lands.

Was it strange, then, that before the clamps were finally screwed down, making the free movement of the individual impossible or, at best, dependent upon bureaucratic whim, our own gaze should swing toward this far yet hospitable horizon.

Previously we had made several visits to America and been stirred not only by the warmth of our welcome, but by the breadth, vigour, and immense potentialities of this vast new country. I felt, indeed, a curious affinity toward these United States, since, but for an unhappy circumstance, I might well have been born within their borders. At the end of the century my father's brothers and sisters had emigrated to California, and my parents were on the point of joining them when my father was stricken with a serious lung condi-

-314-

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Adventures in Two Worlds
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Part One 1
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 13
  • Chapter Three 22
  • Chapter Four 28
  • Chapter Five 40
  • Chapter Six 50
  • Chapter Seven 59
  • Chapter Eight 68
  • Chapter Nine 75
  • Chapter Ten 82
  • Chapter Eleven 92
  • Chapter Twelve 102
  • Chapter Thirteen 112
  • Chapter Fourteen 123
  • Part Two 133
  • Chapter Fifteen 135
  • Chapter Sixteen 143
  • Chapter Seventeen 151
  • Chapter Eighteen 159
  • Chapter Nineteen 171
  • Part Three 181
  • Chapter Twenty 183
  • Chapter Twenty-One 189
  • Chapter Twenty-Two 200
  • Chapter Twenty-Three 208
  • Chapter Twenty-Four 214
  • Chapter Twenty-Five 222
  • Chapter Twenty-Six 230
  • Chapter Twenty-Seven 236
  • Chapter Twenty-Eight 244
  • Chapter Twenty-Nine 252
  • Part Four 257
  • Chapter Thirty 259
  • Chapter Thirty-One 266
  • Chapter Thirty-Two 275
  • Chapter Thirty-Three 279
  • Chapter Thirty-Four 287
  • Chapter Thirty-Five 292
  • Chapter Thirty-Six 297
  • Chapter Thirty-Seven 301
  • Chapter Thirty-Eight 309
  • Chapter Thirty-Nine 314
  • Chapter Forty 321
  • Chapter Forty-One 328
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