C. L. R. James: A Critical Introduction

By Aldon Lynn Nielsen | Go to book overview

4
The Struggle for Happiness

Hegel Ricardo, Shelly, Beethoven, Savigny, all between 1816-1820, stated the fundamental problems of bourgeois society.

C. L. R. James, The Raya Dunayevskaya Collection

Music, great music, will become a possession of the people. It is revolutionary. Why? Because the more the technical discoveries of capitalism bring culture to the masses, the more they resent the degradation and humiliation of their role in production--the grinding slavery of the machine.

C. L. R. James, Special Delivery: The Letters of C. L. R. James to Constance Webb 1939-1948

The end towards which mankind is inexorably developing by the constant overcoming of internal antagonisms is not the enjoyment, ownership, or use of goods, but self-realization, creativity based upon the incorporation into the individual personality of the whole previous development of humanity. Freedom is creative universality, not utility.

C. L. R. James, Modern Politics


I. POPULAR ARTS AND MODERN SOCIETY

C. L. R. James was a historian who was given to exploring the political significance of the Cuban Revolution by means of an exegesis of the surrealist poetry of Aimé Césaire. While discoursing upon the development of the literary imagination in the United States, he was likely to focus on the political polemics of a small band of radical Abolitionists. When advancing his arguments for the independence of the West Indies from colonial rule he turned to talk of calypso singers and novelists. Writing a column on the sport of cricket, James naturally found himself writing about James Baldwin,

-143-

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C. L. R. James: A Critical Introduction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • A Note on Usage xii
  • Introduction - The Black Critic as Prisoner and Artist xiii
  • I - Spheres of Existence What Maisie Knew 3
  • 2 - At the Rendezvous of Victory 51
  • 3 - The Future in the Present 101
  • 4 - The Struggle for Happiness 143
  • Works Cited 189
  • Index 195
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