Constitutional Development in the South Atlantic States. 1776-1860

By Fletcher M. Green | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
COLONIAL BACKGROUND

THE TREATY of Paris of 1763 marked a turning point in the development of constitutional government in the English colonies in America It removed the danger of the French peril and gave the colonists an opportunity to assert their view of their constitutional rights in opposition to the English view. Such a result had been foreseen by discerning men even before 1763. One writer had said that the expulsion of the French would enable the colonists to "unite, shake off the yoke of English monarchy, and erect themselves into a democracy." The English people realized that this expulsion of the French had endangered their control of the colonies, and their newspapers of 1774 teemed with articles which recognized "that a prime cause of the American troubles was the fact that the English had 'taken the French off their backs and placed them in a state of security.' "1

Another significant result of the Treaty of Paris was that it brought England a wide extension of territory, in winning which she had incurred a huge debt, and the administration of which would require a large amount of revenue. The close of the Seven Years' War was followed by a movement for reform and readjustment in the relations of the mother country with her colonies. In so far as the British colonial policy was concerned, this movement took shape in the effort to reform the system of imperial defense; in the effort to correct the abuses in the

____________________
1
F. J. Hinkhouse, The Preliminaries of the American Revolution as seen in the English Press, 1763 to 1775, p. 105.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Constitutional Development in the South Atlantic States. 1776-1860
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 328

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.