Pearl S. Buck: A Cultural Bridge across the Pacific

By Kang Liao | Go to book overview

1
A PARADOXICAL ENIGMA

Pearl Buck was a paradoxical enigma: she was a serious writer, and she was a popular novelist; she was a phenomenonal prizewinner in literature, but she was largely neglected by academic critics; she was a liberal thinker far ahead of her time and yet a defender of certain conventions and traditional values; she was a humanitarian in word and in deed; she was registered on McCarthy's list of Red Sympathizers in 1950s, and she was banned in Mao's China for nearly thirty years. What was she?

Pearl Buck was a serious writer mainly in the sense that most of her books have serious subject matter and they are meant to teach readers as well as to entertain them. One of the consistent themes of her books is the conflict and confluence between the East and West. Her first novel East Wind [ 1930] deals with the differences between Chinese traditions and American traditions and their effects on each other. We find the same theme in many of her other books set in China. The Exile [ 1936] and Fighting Angel [ 1936], the biographies of her parents, illustrate the heroic endeavors but the tragic failures of the American missionaries. Her novels Pavilion of Women [ 1946] and Kinfolk [ 1949] demonstrate how a noble missionary influences a rich Chinese lady and describing appropriate ways for the Americans to give help that China desperately needs. Her historic novel Imperial Woman [ 1956] shows how the last Empress of China, the most stubborn and headstrong Chinese monarch could also change with time and accept Western ways. Peony [ 1948] describes the natural assimilation of the Jews in Kaifen, China, a unique phenomenon in the world. Her autobiography My Several Worlds [ 1954] tells her own stories as an outsider in the conflict between East and West, and portrays herself as a product of the confluence of the Eastern and Western cultures. Three of her novels set in other Asian countries deal with the same serious theme. The Hidden Flower [ 1952] reveals the heartbreaking tragedy of the cultural conflict when an American officer marries a Japanese girl. It also examines the effects

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pearl S. Buck: A Cultural Bridge across the Pacific
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions to the Study of World Literature ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - A Paradoxical Enigma 1
  • Notes 15
  • 2 - A Neglected Laureate 17
  • Notes 44
  • 3 - A Single-Handed Crusader 47
  • Notes 82
  • 4 - A Multicultural Mediator 83
  • Notes 118
  • 5 - A Historic Mirror 121
  • Notes 137
  • Index 173
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 184

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.