Glorying in Tribulation: The Lifework of Sojourner Truth

By Erlene Stetson; Linda David | Go to book overview

Notes
1.
Dorothy Sterling, ed., We Are Your Sisters. Black Women in the Nineteenth Century ( New York. W. W. Norton, 1984),116.
2.
Alice Walker, The Color Purple ( New York. Pocket Books, 1982), 204.
3.
This discussion is drawn from the introductory essay, "Colonization, Immediatism, and Moral Reform", in C. Peter Ripley, et al., eds., The Black Abolitionist Papers ( Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1985), 3:3-20.
4.
Quoted from James McCune Smith, Introduction to a Memorial Discourse; by Rev. Henry Highland Garnet ( Philadelphia: Joseph M. Wilson, 1865), 17- 18. The significance of the parade is discussed in Sterling Stuckey, Slave Culture: Nationalist Theory and the Foundation of Black America ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1987), 143-44.
5.
James Oliver Horton, Free People of Color. Inside the African American Community ( Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1993), 63- 65.
6.
Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an African Slave, Written by Himself, edited by Houston A. Baker Jr. ( New York: Penguin Books, 1982), 143-45.
7.
The Liberator, 6 August 1836 and 13 August 1841, quoted in Horton, Free People of Color, 88.
8.
See the well-known description of this New York state locus of "habitual revivalism" in Whitney R. Cross, The Burned-over District: The Social and Intellectual History of Enthusiastic Religion in Western New York, 1800-1850 ( New York: Cornell University Press, 1950), 3.
9.
Stowe, "Sojourner Truth, the Libyan Sibyl,"475.
10.
Tribune, 7 September 1853.
11.
Roi Ottley and William J. Weatherby, eds., The Negro in New York: An Informal Social History (Dobbs Ferry, New York: Oceana Publications, 1967), 72-73.
12.
See The Cries of New-York, with Fifteen Illustrations, Drawn from Life by a Distinguished Artist;[with] the Poetry by Frances S. Osgood ( New York: John Doggett, Jr., 1846), 5, 29; The New York Street Cries, in Rhyme ( New York: Mahlon Day, ca. 1840), 10, 16.
13.
She told the National Anti-Slavery Standard, 10 September 1853, that "I could not speak English until I was ten years old."
14.
Tribune, 7 September 1853.
15.
Stanton, et al., History of Woman Suffrage, 2:225; Leonard P. Curry , The Free Black in Urban America 1800-1850. The Shadow of the Dream ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1981), 88, 217-18.
16.
Daniel Perlman, "Organizations of the Free Negro in New York City, 1800-1860," Journal of Negro History 56 ( July 1971): 194-95.
17.
Perlman, "Organizations of the Free Negro in New York City,"187.

-81-

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Glorying in Tribulation: The Lifework of Sojourner Truth
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • One - Speaking of Shadows 1
  • Notes 24
  • Two - The Country of the Slave 29
  • Notes 51
  • Three - The Claims of Human Brotherhood 57
  • Notes 81
  • Four - Sojourners 87
  • Notes 120
  • Five - I Saw the Wheat Holding Up Its Head 129
  • Notes 156
  • Six - Harvest Time for the Black Man, and Seed-Sowing Time for Woman: Nancy Works in the Cotton Field 163
  • Notes 194
  • Appendices 201
  • Bibliography 219
  • Index 235
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