Daily Life in the United States, 1960-1990: Decades of Discord

By Myron A. Marty | Go to book overview

6 Mind and Spirit

The most striking changes in education in the early 1960s affected adults, who enjoyed new opportunities in higher and continuing education. A burst of enrollment in higher education had followed the GI Bill in the years after World War II. Of 14 million persons eligible, 2.2 million veterans jumped at the chance to have their college tuition paid as partial compensation for their military service. Eventually, nearly 8 million took advantage of the Bill's educational benefits. This set the stage for continued growth of colleges and universities in the 1960s. In states with rapid population growth the expansion was breathtaking. In Florida, for example, where in the early 1940s there had been one university for men, one for women, and one for blacks, along with one public junior college, by 1972 there were nine public coeducational universities and twenty-eight community colleges.

Education

The demand for such institutions increased in part because of the enrollment of women. The proportion of women in college populations grew from around 33 percent in 1960 to more than 40 percent a decade later. The increased enrollment of both women and men was served mainly by the establishment and enlargement of public institutions. In 1940 about 47 percent of the 1,494,000 students enrolled in colleges and universities were in private, denominational, or sectarian institutions. By 1970 the enrollment reached 7,136,000, with nonpublic institutions serving only 28 percent of the total.

The establishment of community colleges--160 between 1960 and 1966--opened doors for many young people and brought back to school adults seeking to acquire new knowledge and skills. In the five years

-51-

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Daily Life in the United States, 1960-1990: Decades of Discord
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in the Greenwood Press "Daily Life through History" Series ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Notes xiii
  • Introduction xv
  • Introduction xix
  • Part I - Modern Times Flourish and Fade: 1960-1966 1
  • 1 - Family Life 3
  • 2 - Changing Population Patterns 11
  • 3 - Private and Public Lives 25
  • 4 - Consumers in the Material World 35
  • 5 - The Other America 43
  • 6 - Mind and Spirit 51
  • 7 - Technology in Daily Life 57
  • 8 - Cultural Transformations 65
  • Part II - Troubled Times: 1967-1974 77
  • 9 - Changing Families 79
  • 10 - Civil Rights and Group Identities 87
  • 11 - Securities Shaken 99
  • 12 - Cultural Reflections/Cultural Influences 115
  • 13 - Material Aspects of Life 127
  • 14 - Environmental and Consumer Protection 141
  • 15 - Technology's Small Steps and Giant Leaps 149
  • 16 - Hard Knocks for Schools 159
  • 17 - Spiritual Matters 169
  • 18 - Not Ready for New Times 175
  • Part III - Times of Adjustment, 1975-1980 179
  • 19 - Family Changes Continue 181
  • 20 - The Peoples of America 187
  • 21 - Security Concerns 195
  • 22 - Television, Movies, and More 205
  • 23 - Cares of Daily Life 215
  • 24 - Arenas of Discord 225
  • 25 - Pulling Together 239
  • Part IV - Crossing the Postmodern Divide: 1981-1990 245
  • 26 - Family Variations 247
  • 27 - People at the Margins 255
  • 28 - Security Concerns Continue 265
  • 29 - Diversions 277
  • 30 - Concerns of Daily Life 291
  • 31 - Technology 303
  • 32 - More Discord 309
  • 33 - Prospects 331
  • Selected Bibliography 337
  • Index 353
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