Ezra and Dorothy Pound: Letters in Captivity, 1945-1946

By Omar Pound; Robert Spoo | Go to book overview

NOTE ON THE TEXT

BY OMAR POUND

ALL KNOWN LETTERS AND WRITTEN MESSAGES BETWEEN Ezra and Dorothy Pound from the time of his capture in May 1945 to her arrival in Washington, D.C., in July 1946 are printed here. Despite the vicissitudes of war and peace, these letters have survived, along with military orders, travel permits, and other documents, many of them carefully preserved by Dorothy. Other documents were provided by former officers and men of the U.S. Army Disciplinary Training Center (DTC) outside Pisa, or were discovered in government or university archives.

We have aimed throughout at a readable and accurate text. While trying to preserve the appearance and flavor of the originals -- specially Ezra's idiosyncratic positioning of paragraphs, sentences, and words on the page -- we have, when necessary, made modest changes in order to clarify logical sequence within the texts. Numerous factors -- including Dorothy's strategies for overcoming wartime paper shortages, Ezra's use of different army typewriters, his longhand additions of afterthoughts and postscripts in the margins of documents, the interpolation of Chinese characters by both Ezra and Dorothy -- have made the job of preparing a clear reading text particularly challenging and have required us to make adjustments when transferring such complex documents to the printed page. We have photographically reproduced letters by Ezra and Dorothy in the illustration insert to give the reader a sense of the originals.


EDITORIAL CLARIFICATIONS AND DATING OF LETTERS

We have regularized the headings and addresses of all letters, while preserving original spacing and significant variations as far as is conveniently possible. Brief editorial clarifications, as well as translations of most foreign words and phrases, are inserted in the

-xi-

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Ezra and Dorothy Pound: Letters in Captivity, 1945-1946
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Note on the Text xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 33
  • Genoa 37
  • Appendixes 365
  • Works, Libraries, and Collections Cited 381
  • Index 387
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