The Global Positioning System: Assessing National Policies

By Scott Pace; Gerald Frost et al. | Go to book overview

PREFACE
The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a constellation of orbiting satellites operated by the U.S. Department of Defense to provide navigation, positionlocation, and precision timing services to users worldwide. GPS applications have grown beyond their defense and transportation origins and are becoming crucial to a broad range of information industries. The evolution of GPS from a primarily military to a commercial and international resource has raised important policy questions about its regulation, control, protection, and funding.This report describes the findings of a one-year GPS policy study conducted by the RAND Critical Technologies Institute for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and the National Science and Technology Council ( NSTC). The goal of this research has been to assist OSTP and NSTC in assessing alternative national objectives, opportunities, and vulnerabilities in the exploitation of GPS as a national resource. The authors have taken a broad, top-level view toward GPS policy issues that should make this report of interest to a wide audience, including the increasingly large numbers of people who will be affected by GPS technologies in coming years. Policymakers concerned with balancing national security, foreign policy, and economic interests in emerging technologies may find GPS a particularly relevant example of the issues raised by dual-use (i.e., civil and military) technologies.CTI was created in 1991 by an act of Congress. It is a federally funded research and development center ( FFRDC) within RAND. CTI's mission is to
provide analytical support to the Executive Office of the President of the United States,
help decisionmakers understand the likely consequences of their decisions and choose among alternative policies, and
improve understanding in both the public and private sectors of the ways in which technological efforts can better serve national objectives.

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The Global Positioning System: Assessing National Policies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures ix
  • Tables xiii
  • Summary xv
  • Acknowledgments xxix
  • Acronyms xxxi
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - National Interests and Stakeholders in Gps Policy 11
  • Chapter Three - National Security Assessment 45
  • Chapter Four - Commercial Assessment 93
  • Chapter Five - Institutional and Legal Assessment 163
  • Chapter Six - Conclusions and Recommendations 195
  • Appendix A - Gps Technologies and Alternatives 217
  • Appendix B - Gps History, Chronology, and Budgets 237
  • Appendix C - Gps Policy References 271
  • Appendix D - International Legal References for Gps 293
  • Bibliography 305
  • Gps Interviews 361
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