CHAPTER VII
REGULATION AND DISEASE

Regulation nowadays concerned chiefly with sanitation. -- Variety of methods employed. -- Berlin system. -- Equipment and procedure. -- Equipment in Paris, Vienna, Brussels, etc. -- Quality of medical inspection in Berlin, -- in Budapest, -- in other cities, -- in Paris. -- Effect of medical inspection on male indulgence. -- Peculiar characteristics of syphilis, -- of gonorrhœa. -- Amount of disease detected among inscribed women. -- Clinical methods inaccurate. -- Deceptions practised -- Flux in inspected body. -- Failures to report. -- Periods of hospital detention brief. -- Minors, usually non-inscribed, most infectious. -- Inspection and disease among clandestines. -- System conceded to have accomplished nothing hitherto. -- Its possibilities remain to be proved. -- No basis for favorable expectation. -- Insuperable difficulties in the way of successful medical regulation. -- Does isolation of even a small number of infected women achieve some good? -- Amount of disease depends on amount of irregular intercourse. -- The bordell and disease. -- Absurdity of linking disease and crime. -- System illogical and inequitable.

THE preceding chapters have presumably shown that regulation is not necessary to the maintenance of public order; indeed, even the pretense that it is needed for that purpose is now in a fair way to be generally discarded. As I have pointed out, the traveler is rarely aware of differences in external conditions that suggest different police methods of restraining or controlling prostitution. Prostitution may be described as perhaps equally prominent in Berlin and London, -- one a regulated, the other a non-regulated city. Regulation is therefore not a factor that, from this point of view, needs to be taken into ac-

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