Gamaliel Bailey and Antislavery Union

By Stanley Harrold | Go to book overview

Notes
preface
1. Bigelow, Retrospections of an Active Life, 2 vols. ( New York: Baker and Taylor, 1909), 1:212-13.
2. Alan M. Kraut, ed., Crusaders and Compromisers: Essays on the Relationship of the Antislavery Struggle to the Antebellum Party System ( Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1983), 12, 16-17; Lawrence J. Friedman, Gregarious Saints: Self and Community in American Abolitionism, 1830-1870 ( New York: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1982); Lewis Perry, Radical Abolitionism: Anarchy and Government of God in Antislavery Thought ( Ithaca: Cornell Univ. Press, 1973); William M. Wiecek, The Sources of Antislavery Constitutionalism in America, 1760- 1848 ( Ithaca: Cornell Univ. Press, 1977); Ronald G. Walters, The Antislavery Appeal: American Abolitionism After 1830 ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, 1976).
3. Eric Foner, "The Causes of the American Civil War: Recent Interpretations and New Directions," Civil War History 20 ( September 1974): 197-214; Richard D. Brown, Modernization: The Transformation of American Life, 1600-1865 ( New York: Hill and Wang, 1976); James M. McPherson, Ordeal by Fire: The Civil War and Reconstruction ( New York: Knopf, 1982), 5-22; James B. Stewart, "Abolitionists, Insurgents, and Third Parties: Sectionalism and Partisan Politics in Northern Whiggery, 1836-1844," in Kraut, Crusaders and Compromisers, 26-30; Eric Foner, Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men: The Ideology of the Republican Party Before the Civil War ( New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 1970); Michael F. Holt, The Political Crisis of the 1850's ( New York: John Wiley and Sons, 1978).
4. While them are recent biographies of abolitionists and of antislavery politicians, Bailey's career links the two groups. Owen Lovejoy's career also spanned all the manifestations of the antislavery movement. But Lovejoy did not enjoy Bailey's stature as an abolitionist or Liberty spokesman. See Kraut, Crusaders and Compromisers, 6; Edward Magdol, Owen Lovejoy: An Abolitionist in Congress ( New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers Univ. Press, 1967), 3-70.
5. For example Joel Goldfarb regards Bailey as a "practical abolitionist," who rather abruptly changed his emphasis from moral reform to political action in 1941. Ronald G. Walters sees Bailey as an abolitionist who viewed political action as a means of moral reform. Frederick J. Blue sees him as a Free-Soiler whose opposition to the extension of slavery rested on his moral opposition to slavery everywhere. David R. Bard portrays Bailey as a "conservative antislavery editor" who after 1847 clashed with "radical abolitionists" over the Free-Soil and Republican party platforms and deemphasized moral opposition to slavery. Lawrence J. Friedman and Eric Foner class Bailey respectively with political antislavery "radicals" and with the Radical Republicans of the 1850s. See Goldfarb, "The Life of Gamaliel Bailey Prior to the Founding of the National Era: The Orientation of a Practical Abolitionist" (unpublished Ph.D. diss., University of California, 1958), 245-50; Antislavery Appeal, 15-16; Blue, The Free Soilers: Third Party Politics, 1848-1854 ( Urbana: Univ. of Illinois Press, 1973), 88-90; Bard, "Gamaliel Bailey and the National Era: A Conservative Antislavery Editor in the Crisis Years, 1847-1859" (unpublished Ph.D. diss., University of Maine, 1974); Friedman, Gregarious Saints, 227-28; Foner, Free Soil, 114.
6. Bertram Wyatt-Brown, Lewis Tappan and the Evangelical War Against Slavery ( Cleveland: Press of Case Western Reserve Univ., 1969), 45-49; James B. Stewart, Holy Warriors:The Abolitionists and American Slavery

-216-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gamaliel Bailey and Antislavery Union
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 306

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.