Narratives of Exploration and Adventure

By John Charles Frémont; Allan Nevins | Go to book overview

APPENDIX
GEOGRAPHICAL MEMOIR

Upon Upper California in Illustration of His Map of Oregon and California By John C. Frémont*

On the second day of February, in the year 1847, during my absence on my third expedition of topographical survey in the western part of this continent, a resolve was passed by the Senate directing the construction of two maps -- one of the central section of the Rocky Mountains, and the other of Oregon and Upper California -- from the materials collected by me in the two previous expeditions, and with the additions which the then existing expedition might furnish; and Mr. Charles Preuss, my assistant in the first and second expeditions, was employed to commence the work.

On my return to the United States in the month of September last, I found Mr. Preuss closely engaged upon the work on which the Senate had employed him; and, from that time to the present, I have myself given all the time that could be spared from other engagements to supply the additions which the last expedition has enabled me to make. Conceiving that the map of Oregon and California was of the most immediate and pressing importance, I first directed my attention to its preparation, in order to bring it into a condition as soon as possible to be laid before the Senate; which is now done.

In laying this map of Oregon and Upper California before the Senate, I deem it proper to show the extent and general character of the work, and how far it may be depended on as correct, as being founded on my own or other surveys, and how far it is conjectural, and only presented as the best that is known.

In extent, it embraces the whole western side of this continent between the eastern base of the Rocky Mountains and the Pacific Ocean, and between the straits of Fuca and the Gulf of California, taking for its outline on the north the boundary line with Great Britain, and on the South, including the Bay of San Diego, the head of the Gulf of California, the rivers Colorado and Gila, and all the country through which the line of the late treaty with Mexico would run, from El Paso del Norte to the sea.

____________________
*
Washington, 1848.

-509-

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