PREFACE

Anyone with an interest in the problems of highly creative children will find this volume useful in guiding a wide range of creative talent at all age and educational levels. In preparing this material, I have drawn most heavily upon my own research and that of my colleagues concerning the creative thinking of children, adolescents, and adults. Although my emphasis is upon the problems of highly creative children, I believe you will find these materials useful in guiding a wide range of creative talent at all age and educational levels. I have also attempted to give these research findings and observations meaning from my experience as a teacher, counselor, and principal in a high school and as a college teacher and counselor, roles in which I have met many highly creative individuals. I have also drawn upon my research concerning behavior under emergency and extreme conditions, especially situations involving coercion.

In the first chapter, I have attempted to tell why you should be concerned about effectively guiding highly creative individuals. I have also tried to describe the nature of the unique guidance needs of highly creative individuals.

In the second chapter, I have presented material concerning the assessment of creative talent and growth. In this chapter, I have reviewed a number of definitions of creative thinking and have stated the one which has guided our research in the Bureau of Educational Research at the University of Minnesota. I have pointed out some of the deficiencies of traditional measures of intellectual talent and personality to call attention to the need for supplementing these measures with instruments involving the creative thinking abilities and characteristics of the creative personality. Then, I have reviewed the long, interesting, and not very well-known history of the development of tests of creative thinking.

In the third chapter, I have described most of the Minnesota Tests of Creative Thinking and presented some of the reasoning behind them. I

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