SUBJECT INDEX

A
Academic values, emphasis on traditional, in IQ tests, 19
Achievement, in relation to high creative ability and IQ, 59-63
Adjustment problems of creative children, 104- 124
Administrators:
qualifications for guiding creative talent, 203-209
relationships with creative teachers, 204- 206
Adolescents:
creativity in, 28-31
personality studies of creative, 81-83
Adults:
causes of decrease in creative productivity of, 101-102
personality studies of creative, 81-83
Age and peak productivity, studies on, 100-102
Allport-Vernon-Lindzey Study of Values, 22, 67, 68, 83
American Association of School Administrators, 115
American Educational Research Association, 12, 198-199
American Personnel and Guidance Association, 166
American Psychological Association, 34
Anxieties and fears, coping with, by creative children, 158-159
Applied Imagination, 197
Artistic imagination in preschool children, creative, 24
Assessment devices:
for creative motivations, 70-72
for identification of creative personalities, 67-70
to measure creative achievement, need for, 202-203
Assessment of creative thinking abilities:
early childhood, 25-26
elementary school years, 28
high school years, 30-31
higher education years, 32-38
and IQ tests, 18-21
Assets and limitations, creative acceptance of, 174-177
Association for Higher Education, 12
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 196
Attitudes and values of creative children, 118- 120

B
Behavior, group, as validity evidence of creativity, 50-51
Behavior problems, as a result of repressed creativity, 131-133
The Birthday Present, 197

C
California Test of Mental Maturity, 55, 58, 59, 78
"Can do" and "will do," discrepancy between, 72-76
Causal thinking, 223-225
Challenging tasks, need for, to develop creativity, 127-128
Childhood years, creativity in:
assessment, studies on, 25-26
manifestations, 23-25
Children, see Creative chidren
Children's Thinking, 197
Cliques and creative growth, 182-183
Closure, concept of, 215-216
Coercive strategies vs. creative guidance approaches:
"big lie," 177-179
ego inflation, 186-187
exploiting personality vulnerabilities, 174- 177
identification, 172-173
omnipotence and omniscience, 170-172
powerlessness, 167-170
singleness of purpose, 179-182
unfriendly environment, 182-186
College admission, recognition of creativity in, 12, 146
College years, see Higher education
Competition and creativity, 109
Complexity, as a dimension of creativity, see Elaboration
Conflicts between expression and repression of creativity, coping with, 138-139

-271-

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