The Life and Letters of Henry Cuyler Bunner

By Gerard E. Jensen | Go to book overview

PREFACE

THE NAME Bunner may suggest very little to the present generation of booklovers, but to those who used to read the old Puck the name brings back the thrill of Short Sixes, of Made in France, and of the age that produced their author. Bunner's life and his letters should prove entertaining to any person who reads books in any generation that has learned to distinguish wit from humor, and the biographer has assembled these records with the hope that Bunner's works may be discovered by another generation of readers.

My debt to Bunner's widow is great. I have had a free hand with all the letters and manuscripts stored in the attic of 63 Church Street. Bunner's brother Rudolph, recently deceased, and A. W. Callisen have supplied practically all the details of the author's boyhood, schooling, and early literary ventures. I have had the privileges of the libraries at Yale, Harvard, Princeton, and Columbia and similar courtesies from the public libraries in Boston, New York, and New London. I have had the assistance of several persons who have not survived to read this acknowledgment--Sydney Rosenfeld, Albert Bigelow Paine, F. B. Opper, Joseph L. French, William C. Gibson, W. H. Allen, Robert Underwood Johnson, E. S. Martin, Henry G. Paine, Harry Leon Wilson, W. J. Henderson, Mary K. Ford, and Brander Matthews. In various ways W. Adolphe Roberts, Humphrey T. Nichols, Arthur H. Nason, Rodman Gilder, Henry W. Lanier, Robert Bridges, Bliss Perry, Arthur B. Maurice, Evelyn Miller, and the staff of the Connecticut College Library have given me valuable help. Professor Jay B. Hubbell and Professor Arthur H. Quinn have assisted me in more ways than they may realize, and to President Katharine Blunt I am grateful for confidence in the merit of my endeavor.

I am indebted to Henry W. Wells and the Sewanee Review for permission to quote from an article by Benjamin W. Wells; to E. P. Dutton and Co., Inc., from J. L. Ford Forty-OddYears in the Literary Shop

-vii-

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The Life and Letters of Henry Cuyler Bunner
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Introductory ix
  • Contents xi
  • Chapter I - Ancestry and Childhood 1
  • Chapter II - Youth and Education 8
  • Chapter III - The Du Fais Letters, 1873-74 13
  • Chapter IV - Apprenticeship 23
  • Chapter V - Commencement 30
  • Chapter VI - Chiefly Dramatic 40
  • Chapter VII - Verse and Prose 50
  • Chapter VIII - New Friends and New Ventures 60
  • Chapter IX - Chiefly Epistolary 75
  • Chapter X - In the Thick of Things 92
  • Chapter XI - Matrimony and Music 105
  • Chapter XII - Four Busy Years 116
  • Chapter XIII - The New and the Old 130
  • Chapter XIV - A Multitude of Things 143
  • Chapter XV - Approaching His End 153
  • Chapter XVI - Bunner's Character 164
  • Chapter XVII - The Man of Letters 179
  • Chapter XVIII - The Poet 189
  • Chapter XIX The Editor 199
  • Chapter XX - The Short-Story Writer 212
  • Appendix 223
  • Index 225
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