The Life and Letters of Henry Cuyler Bunner

By Gerard E. Jensen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
NEW FRIENDS AND NEW VENTURES

IT WAS IN New York and not New London that Learned and Bunner first became acquainted, and curiously enough, their friendship grew out of a serious mishap. The issue of Puck for December 17, 1879, had printed a contribution by Learned called "Disinterment Ode: Dedicated to the Counsel in the Hayden Case," and a letter to the editor signed "Peter Quince." Two weeks later under the caption "Let Us Get This Right," Puck had reprinted from the New London Telegram for December 18 a statement charging Puck with stealing the ode from their columns, and saying that the verse had been sent by "Mr. Walter Learned, of the Savings Bank of New London, Conn., with a note from which we inferred it was an original production." Bunner announced that justice would be done, and wrote a tart letter to Learned. In response, the accused made a hurried trip to New York and speedily straightened out the whole matter. The manuscript copy had been given to a legal friend who wished to send it to one of the counsel in the Hayden case. To Learned's great annoyance, his friend had sent another copy to the local newspaper without the author's knowledge. All was now serene. And after five years of ardent friendship and frequent letters, Learned became Bunner's brother-in-law.

From November, 1880, to the end of 1881 the course of Puck is interesting to follow. The editor does not intend to surfeit his reader with detail, but does feel impelled to select from each year of the weekly those items which suggest the course of events. Late in November we read of the arrival of Salvini, and there is much talk about Bernhardt success in La Dame aux Camélias, Hernani, and Phèdre. "The excitement about Sadie Bernhardt has rendered necessary the issue of a fifth edition of Mr. J. Brander Matthews' Theatres of Paris, perhaps the most lively, entertaining and best book of the kind

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The Life and Letters of Henry Cuyler Bunner
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Introductory ix
  • Contents xi
  • Chapter I - Ancestry and Childhood 1
  • Chapter II - Youth and Education 8
  • Chapter III - The Du Fais Letters, 1873-74 13
  • Chapter IV - Apprenticeship 23
  • Chapter V - Commencement 30
  • Chapter VI - Chiefly Dramatic 40
  • Chapter VII - Verse and Prose 50
  • Chapter VIII - New Friends and New Ventures 60
  • Chapter IX - Chiefly Epistolary 75
  • Chapter X - In the Thick of Things 92
  • Chapter XI - Matrimony and Music 105
  • Chapter XII - Four Busy Years 116
  • Chapter XIII - The New and the Old 130
  • Chapter XIV - A Multitude of Things 143
  • Chapter XV - Approaching His End 153
  • Chapter XVI - Bunner's Character 164
  • Chapter XVII - The Man of Letters 179
  • Chapter XVIII - The Poet 189
  • Chapter XIX The Editor 199
  • Chapter XX - The Short-Story Writer 212
  • Appendix 223
  • Index 225
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