The Life and Letters of Henry Cuyler Bunner

By Gerard E. Jensen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII
FOUR BUSY YEARS

PUCK HAS now outgrown its old quarters and is about to move into its own building (erected jointly with Jacob Ottman) at the southwest corner of Houston and Mulberry streets, on February 1, 1886. The periodical is on the crest of the wave and will so continue to the end of our account. It continues to attack the abuses of the day, and to publish verse and prose of a humorous nature. The issue for February 24 of that swift year prints Keppler cartoon ridiculing "Pirate Publishers," and Bunner's editorial argues that an international copyright will benefit not only the authors but also the readers of books on this side of the water. The spoils system, trade unions, and boycotting come under observation. Grover Cleveland's marriage is duly celebrated. And on August 4 Total Abstinence comes in for its annual disapproval. On the same date Tilden passes out of the picture, and Puck's next number says a few kind words. Late in October the editor scrutinizes the candidates for the job of mayor in New York City--Messrs. Hewitt, Roosevelt, and George. Puck has no use for the "champion of oppressed labor." Hewitt is old and experienced; Roosevelt is young and energetic. A proper choice is difficult. Bunner has been contributing a bit of verse now and then. And the names of C. J. Taylor and A. B. Frost now are frequently signed to illustrated jokes and cartoons--Frost being chiefly concerned with comic drawings in series.

The first of ten letters from Bunner to Frost, now in the possession of Mrs. John Frost of Pasadena, runs as follows:

330 E. 17th St., N. Y.

Dec. 18/86.

MY DEAR FROST:

The big black picture is beautiful. There isn't another man in this country who could have done it--nor in England either.*

____________________
*
Of course.

-116-

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The Life and Letters of Henry Cuyler Bunner
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Introductory ix
  • Contents xi
  • Chapter I - Ancestry and Childhood 1
  • Chapter II - Youth and Education 8
  • Chapter III - The Du Fais Letters, 1873-74 13
  • Chapter IV - Apprenticeship 23
  • Chapter V - Commencement 30
  • Chapter VI - Chiefly Dramatic 40
  • Chapter VII - Verse and Prose 50
  • Chapter VIII - New Friends and New Ventures 60
  • Chapter IX - Chiefly Epistolary 75
  • Chapter X - In the Thick of Things 92
  • Chapter XI - Matrimony and Music 105
  • Chapter XII - Four Busy Years 116
  • Chapter XIII - The New and the Old 130
  • Chapter XIV - A Multitude of Things 143
  • Chapter XV - Approaching His End 153
  • Chapter XVI - Bunner's Character 164
  • Chapter XVII - The Man of Letters 179
  • Chapter XVIII - The Poet 189
  • Chapter XIX The Editor 199
  • Chapter XX - The Short-Story Writer 212
  • Appendix 223
  • Index 225
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