The Life and Letters of Henry Cuyler Bunner

By Gerard E. Jensen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII
THE NEW AND THE OLD

THE NEXT FEW years are conspicuous for the high quality of Bunner's fiction and the maturity of mind that directs his varied activities. The progress of Puck is aided rather than hindered by Bunner's devotion to the short story, and the journal continues on its prosperous way. Early in February, 1890, Bunner approves of McKinley's efforts to promote a Customs Administration Bill (as the cartoon phrases it), and in matters political is still independent and altruistic. Another cartoon offers Chicago as the scene for the World's Fair. The midsummer number (July 16) prints Number One of Bunner Short Sixes: Stories to Be Read While the Candle Burns. The series is officially started with "Col. Brereton's Aunty," even though Bunner had already written one of the tales later admitted to the printed volume. The July 23 issue prints "The Love-Letters of Smith"; the next number contains "Nice People"; the next, "Hector"; and after that, "The Nine-Cent Girls." The editorials for August 20 criticize the Knights of Labor strike on the New York Central Railroad, and ridicule John Wanamaker's attempt to exclude Tolstoi's latest work--The Kreutzer Sonata-- from the privileges of the Post Office--"a new proof of his incompetency." Bunner adds: "We have no liking for The Kreutzer Sonata. It is a book that is both stupid and silly. . . . Count Tolstoi owes what popularity he has in this country to . . . Mr. W. D. Howells. . . . It is not a book which calls for any such exclusion." The same number contains the sixth of the Short Sixes--"Zenobia's Infidelity." The series goes on uninterrupted with "The Two Churches of Quawket," "The Tenor," "A Round Up," "Mr. Copernicus and the Proletariat," "A Sisterly Scheme, " and "Zozo." Meanwhile W. J. Henderson, as "Tricotrin," writes a burlesque "Schweitzer Sonata," and Dalrymple cartoons the Walking Delegate and His Work. The issue of

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The Life and Letters of Henry Cuyler Bunner
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Introductory ix
  • Contents xi
  • Chapter I - Ancestry and Childhood 1
  • Chapter II - Youth and Education 8
  • Chapter III - The Du Fais Letters, 1873-74 13
  • Chapter IV - Apprenticeship 23
  • Chapter V - Commencement 30
  • Chapter VI - Chiefly Dramatic 40
  • Chapter VII - Verse and Prose 50
  • Chapter VIII - New Friends and New Ventures 60
  • Chapter IX - Chiefly Epistolary 75
  • Chapter X - In the Thick of Things 92
  • Chapter XI - Matrimony and Music 105
  • Chapter XII - Four Busy Years 116
  • Chapter XIII - The New and the Old 130
  • Chapter XIV - A Multitude of Things 143
  • Chapter XV - Approaching His End 153
  • Chapter XVI - Bunner's Character 164
  • Chapter XVII - The Man of Letters 179
  • Chapter XVIII - The Poet 189
  • Chapter XIX The Editor 199
  • Chapter XX - The Short-Story Writer 212
  • Appendix 223
  • Index 225
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