The Life and Letters of Henry Cuyler Bunner

By Gerard E. Jensen | Go to book overview

APPENDIX

IN THIS VOLUME no attempt is made to give a complete list of Bunner's unpublished manuscripts, and the reader must refer to the Index for the list of published works. No formal bibliography of the works consulted seems necessary in a biographical narrative of this kind.

Where the identity of certain persons named in Bunner's letters gives trouble, the biographer has attempted to give the proper initials after the name in the Index.

No attempt has been made to print all of Bunner's letters, but the omissions have not been made with a view of concealing anything about his private life, for there is nothing to be hidden. It is not important for us to know whether Bunner took one cocktail and two cigarettes for lunch or two cocktails and one cigarette, and nothing is to be gained by reproducing the letter in which Bunner betrays a youthful reluctance to be regarded as anything but metropolitan.

The biographer regrets that there is not room for a full history of Puck, but the reader may find in Mott History of American Magazines a good brief account of the magazine. For the particulars of format and so forth the reader is referred to the notations in Mott which speak of the first number, for example, as a quarto of sixteen pages selling for ten cents. The History tells when the various cartoonists came and went, and tells an interesting brief story about Pulitzer and Puck.

-223-

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The Life and Letters of Henry Cuyler Bunner
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Introductory ix
  • Contents xi
  • Chapter I - Ancestry and Childhood 1
  • Chapter II - Youth and Education 8
  • Chapter III - The Du Fais Letters, 1873-74 13
  • Chapter IV - Apprenticeship 23
  • Chapter V - Commencement 30
  • Chapter VI - Chiefly Dramatic 40
  • Chapter VII - Verse and Prose 50
  • Chapter VIII - New Friends and New Ventures 60
  • Chapter IX - Chiefly Epistolary 75
  • Chapter X - In the Thick of Things 92
  • Chapter XI - Matrimony and Music 105
  • Chapter XII - Four Busy Years 116
  • Chapter XIII - The New and the Old 130
  • Chapter XIV - A Multitude of Things 143
  • Chapter XV - Approaching His End 153
  • Chapter XVI - Bunner's Character 164
  • Chapter XVII - The Man of Letters 179
  • Chapter XVIII - The Poet 189
  • Chapter XIX The Editor 199
  • Chapter XX - The Short-Story Writer 212
  • Appendix 223
  • Index 225
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