The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1

By C. Peter Ripley | Go to book overview

7.
Charles Lenox Remond to Charles B. Ray 30 June 1840

Beginning in 1840, many black abolitionists ventured abroad as delegates to international reform conventions. The first of these delegates, Charles Lenox Remond, attended the mid-June meeting of the World's Anti-Slavery Convention in London. Remond and other Garrisonians refused to be seated as delegates after the convention voted to exclude women from active participation in the proceedings. Remond addressed the delegates only after the formal convention was completed. On 24 June, he and other Garrisonians attended the annual anniversary meeting of the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society. Remond summarized his first two weeks in England in a 30 June 1840 letter to black editor Charles B. Ray. Whereas other Garrisonian delegates sent back convention reports to leading white antislavery papers, Remond chose to inform readers of the Colored American, the only reform paper directed at a black audience. CA, 3 October 1840; Miriam L. Usrey, "Charles Lenox Remond, Garrison's Ebony Echo: World Anti-Slavery Convention, 1840," EIHC 106:113-25 ( April 1970).

London, [ England] June 30th, 1840

My DEAR FRIEND RAY: 1

Faithful to my promise, although in the midst of engagements, I steal a moment, not to fill this sheet, as my time will not admit, but to inform you of my safe arrival and good health at this time, and that this sheet may meet you with your wife, sisters and friends in possession of the same privilege is my best wish. In referring to the subject of anti slavery on this side the Atlantic, permit me to say, as a silent listener, I was much interested in the discussions during the sitting of the British and Foreign Anti Slavery Society2 (not World's Convention) 3 as we had fondly and anxiously anticipated, which facts, with many others, forbid my taking a seat, and participating in its deliberations. That on my arrival I learned with much sorrow of the rejection of the female delegation, I need not mention. And in few instances through life have I met with greater disappointment, especially in view of the fact, that I was almost entirely indebted to the kind and generous members of the Bangor Female Anti- Slavery Society, the Portland sewing circle, and the Newport Young Ladies Juvenile Anti Slavery Society, for the aid in visiting this country. And I can assure you it was among my most happy reflections to know, that in taking my seat in the World's Convention, I should do so, the honored representative of three female associations, at once most praiseworthy in

-71-

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