The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1

By C. Peter Ripley | Go to book overview

11.
Charles Lenox Remond to Nathaniel P. Rogers 2 October 1841

Charles Lenox Remond's Irish lecture tour vindicated his earlier independent course of action. Begun in late May 1841, it proved to be the most successful phase of his seventeen-month stay in Britain. Dublin abolitionist Richard D. Webb reported to William Lloyd Garrison that Remond's Irish lectures were "triumphant." Remond delivered many speeches to receptive and overflowing crowds in churches, town halls, and commercial buildings throughout Ireland. After beginning with a series of six meetings in Dublin, he spent much of the summer in the southwest, lecturing in Wexford, Waterford, Limerick, County Clare, and other locations. From there, he proceeded to Belfast and Dublin, returning to England in mid-November. Remond's 2 October report to Nathaniel P. Rogers on his Irish visit reflects his pleasure with the tour and his recognition of Ireland's importance to American antislavery-- a significance understood by many later black abolitionists in Britain. NASS, 14 October 1841; Ward, "Charles Lenox Remond,"102; Lib, 24 September, 19 November 1841; Charles L. Remond to Richard Allen, 19 November 1841, IreDFh [4:0302].

Richard Allen's 62 High Street
Dublin, [ Ireland]
October 2d, 1841

My Very dear Friend.

I neither intend or pretend this as a letter to You. In view of the vast amount I should be delighted to write both favorable & unfavorable respecting our cause in America & the part I honestly believe Old Ireland is destined to take in the matter and as I took my pen for the purpose of giving You the name of a subscriber for Your paper. 1 Must be content with doing so inasmuch as my limited time will not permit me to do more than add that never during my little Anti Slavery experience have I seen so much to rejoice over as the prominance our Enterprise is obtaining with the public mind both at home & abroad--especially in England & Ireland--& the latter country I am fully convinced is capable of exerting an influence more direct & important[,] more open & important than thousands of intelligent persons have been wont to imagine. I have visited some six or seven important cities & towns in Ireland. In all of [them] I have held Anti American Slavery meetings and never in my life have I seen deeper interest Exhibited in proportion as the Irish people become Enlightened.

I little supposed on crossing I should so prolong my visit among this

-97-

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