The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1

By C. Peter Ripley | Go to book overview

12.
Charles Lenox Remond to Richard Allen 19 November 1841

One important result of Charles Lenox Remond's British lecture tour was the acquisition of household goods, craft items, and other commodities, to be sold at the Boston Anti-Slavery Bazaar. Remond was the first of several black abolitionists to collect British contributions for the bazaar. These goods proved to be popular at the Christmas week festivities and increased both the number of visitors to the bazaar and the profits earned by its sponsor, the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society. In ensuing years, the display and sale of foreign items helped make the Boston bazaar a chief source of funding for the American Anti-Slavery Society. Remond discussed the collection and shipment to Boston of goods for the bazaar in a 19 November 1841 letter to Irish abolitionist Richard Allen. Ward, "Charles Lenox Remond,"103-5.

15 Lever Street
Manchester, [ England]
November 19th, 1841

Richard Allen

My Very Dear Friend,

On my return from Liverpool last evening I found Your welcome, anxious, & zealous favor in writing and I confess it delighted me, but I am unwilling at the same to admit You are or can be more anxious & zealous & interested for the timely arrival of the Boxes in Boston than myself & be assured I am not acting either indifferently or unadvisedly, & wind & weather permitting I will convey them Myself to their place of destination in due time. Some of the Boxes did not arrive until Yesterday noon & if they had all arrived on the same day with those from Dublin the time was too late for them to be received on board of Steamer. I have together with Mr. Thompson written by the Steamer of today to Mrs. Chapman intimating the circumstance & that they may depend & calculate upon my arrival & their receipt by the Columbia which sails on the 4th. december and now dont give yourself any uneasiness I beg. The contribution will be advertised & with an ordinary Chance I shall be one week in advance of the Bazaar. 1 No meetings in either Manchester, Liverpool or any other place would have detained me a single hour. Im ready to go, willing to go, pray to go, and would have gone if possible, "Vincit [illegible] patiae." And on Monday we go again to Liverpool. Shall [enter] the Boxes, take my passage & have all things in readiness. If it had been my happiness to get off by the Acadia it would have been joyful to see Yourself & dear Mrs. Allen2 and any others of the dear friends from

-100-

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