The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1

By C. Peter Ripley | Go to book overview

even to the stranger and the sojourner, the moment he sets his foot upon British earth, that the ground on which he treads is holy, and consecrated by the genius of Universal Emancipation. No matter in what language his doom may have been pronounced; no matter what complexion incompatible with freedom an Indian or an African sun may have burnt upon him; no matter in what disastrous battle his liberty may have been cloven down; no matter with what solemnities he may have been devoted upon the altar of Slavery; the first moment he touches the sacred soil of Britain, the altar and the god sink together in the dust; his soul walks abroad in her own majesty; his body swells beyond the measure of his chains that burst from around him, and he stands redeemed, regenerated, and disenthralled, by the irresistible Genius of UNIVERSAL EMANCIPATION."


CONCLUSION

If any, touched by contemplating the wrongs of the American Slave, should feel a desire to hold out to him a helping hand, they may be assured that opportunity is not wanting. For many years Societies for the Abolition of Slavery have existed in the Free States of the Union. Boston, in Massachusetts, can especially boast of a noble band of men and women who are devoting their lives, amid personal dangers and ceaseless opposition, to the cause of einancipation. 45 One of the instrumentalities they employ is a Bazaar, upon a very extensive scale, held annually, for a whole week, in Boston. To this the Anti-slavery inhabitants of the United States make large contributions; but its greatest attraction is found to consist in the presents of stationery, basket-work, toys, Honiton lace and other British manufactures, elegant and fashionable articles of wearing apparel, fancy-work, drawings, autographs, &c., sent from Dublin, Cork, Edinburgh, Perth, Glasgow, Bristol, Leeds, and occasionally from other towns.

This Bazaar is frequented not only by Abolitionists, but by numbers of wealthy and educated inhabitants of Boston and other towns, who take no interest in the movement, but are ready purchasers of the goods offered for disposal. A considerable sum of money is thus realised; this does not, however, constitute the chief value of the Sale. It serves the great purpose of drawing public attention to the question of Slavery, to the evils of which the mass of American society are unhappily, indifferent, if not favourable. The energy exhibited by a small body of their countrymen in getting up so large a Bazaar, induces some to examine into the object which has called it forth; while it is especially found that the beauty and costliness of the articles transmitted from this side the Atlantic cause others to reflect upon the character of an institution

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