The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1

By C. Peter Ripley | Go to book overview

27.
Henry Highland Garnet to Samuel Ringgold Ward 4 September 1850

Henry Highland Garnet, the leading black spokesman for free produce in the United States, was invited by Henry and Anna Richardson, leaders of the British free produce movement, to lecture on the subject in Britain. The Richardsons welcomed Garnet to Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, in August 1850. Garnet's British free produce tour reinvigorated the movement in Britain. On the eve of his tour, he penned a 4 September note to second cousin and black abolitionist colleague Samuel Ringgold Ward, who edited the Impartial Citizen. Garnet promised to occasionally provide him with "free produce documents and facts" to inform his readers of the progress of the movement in Britain. Schor, Henry Highland Garnet, 111-12.

NEWCASTLE-ON-TYNE, [ England] Sept[ember] 4, 1850

DEAR COUSIN S. R. WARD:

I am permitted to say, by Mrs. Henry Richardson, 1 that she will take pleasure in furnishing you with "free produce documents and facts," from time to time, if you will feel free to publish them in the Impartial Citizen. 2 I took the liberty to mention your paper to her, because I knew that you feel friendly towards this movement, which to us is one of the most important instrumentalities for the overthrow of negro slavery. I should not be surprised to learn that, through the medium of investigation, and by the aid of the Divine Spirit, you have made rapid progress. I have ventured to go so far as to assure Mrs. Richardson that you would not slight any document which she might send to you. I am annoyed to see any one who, like you and I, has tasted the bitter cup of slavery, withholding his influence and talents from this good cause. Yours truly,

HENRY H. GARNET3

Impartial Citizen ( New York, N.Y.), 5 October 1850.

1.
Anna Atkins Richardson ( 1806-1892) married Henry Richardson of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1833. A member of the Society of Friends, she was involved in many reform causes, especially antislavery, peace, and aiding European emigrants. Anna Richardson belonged to the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society. In 1846 she was instrumental in the purchase of Frederick Douglass's freedom; her continued support of Douglass and her friendship with Julia Griffiths, Douglass's associate, made her suspect among British Garrisonians. She attended the Paris Peace Congress in 1849. In the 1850s, Anna Richardson and her husband helped lead the free produce movement in England and recruited black lec-

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