The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1

By C. Peter Ripley | Go to book overview

32.
Speech by William Craft Delivered at the Nicolson Street Church, Edinburgh, Scotland 30 December 1850

Soon after meeting in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, William Craft and William Wells Brown proceeded to Edinburgh to lecture there during the Christmas holidays. On 30 December 1850, they attended the annual meeting of the Edinburgh Ladies Anti-Slavery Society at Nicolson Street Church. Following the presentation of the society's annual report, Brown offered an antislavery resolution and made some brief remarks about the Fugitive Slave Law. Craft then spoke and was well received, although one reporter indicated that the audience was disappointed by Ellen's absence. William's story of his and Ellen's flight from slavery, and then from Boston, was made more dramatic by his status as the first refugee from the Fugitive Slave Law to appear on the British lecture circuit. His early speeches--factual accounts of slave life and the escapes from Georgia and Boston--were typical of those offered by his fugitive slave contemporaries. NASS, 30 January 1851; Lib, 24 January 1851.

It affords me great pleasure to meet with you here this evening, not because I feel capable of interesting you with a speech, but because I feel myself in the midst of friends, amongst whom I can exclaim, Thank God, I am free! (Applause.) It is only two years since I escaped from Slavery, and previous to my escape I was unable to read a syllable. I hope, then, if I should speak ungrammatically, or so as not to be clearly understood, that my friends will attribute it, not to any neglect of mine or of my parents, but to that accursed system which kept me in a state of ignorance. (Hear, hear.) My wife and I escaped together from Georgia, and came on to Boston, a distance of 2000 miles. We remained quietly in Boston for about two years, till the passage of the Fugitive Slave Bill. A couple of ruffians, 1 who were hired by the men that claimed us as slaves 2 to come to Boston and arrest us, got out warrants for our apprehension and placed them in the hands of the District Marshal, 3 but, for some reason or other, the Marshal refused to execute them. He knew that we had been slaves, and that, from knowing what Slavery was, I was prepared to protect myself and my wife at all hazards against a United States Marshal or anybody else that attempted to drag us back to bondage. (Loud applause.) A Committee of Vigilance4 was formed in Boston for the purpose of protecting us and other fugitive slaves who should be claimed under the new law; but we were compelled in the end to flee to a country where we could feel ourselves in greater security. But I suppose it will be more interesting if I give an account of the manner in which we

-246-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 612

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.