The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1

By C. Peter Ripley | Go to book overview

57.
Speech by William G. Allen Delivered at the Stock Exchange, Leeds, England 29 November 1853

Black abolitionist lecturers spoke authoritatively about the close connection between slavery and northern racial prejudice. Free black William G. Allen was particularly careful to suggest this relationship for British listeners. In November 1852 the newly founded Leeds Anti-Slavery Association engaged Allen to offer a series of three lectures on American slavery and racial prejudice at the Stock Exchange in Leeds. The first lecture was presented on 29 November 1853, with Leeds's mayor John Wilson serving as chairman. Leeds Anti-Slavery Association president Wilson Armistead and vice-president Joseph Lupton appeared on the platform. Prior to Allen's lecture, the mayor read a handbill that had been displayed in an American post office offering a $100-dollar reward for the recovery of a black slave named Peter, noting the inhumane treatment of slaves that it intimated. Allen then lectured on "American Slavery and the Prejudice against Colour." LI, 26 November, 3 December 1853; LM, 3 December 1853; ASRL, 1 January 1854.

Professor ALLEN (an intelligent gentleman of but slight colour) then came forward, and was received with applause. He said he certainly felt very much obliged by the kind reception; it showed to him their kind feeling, which, however, he must accept more as a tribute to the cause he stood there to advocate. He would (for the sake of this cause) he was an orator; but, unfortunately, he was not a speech maker by profession, having lived in the main the quiet life of a teacher. He had not come there to deal out indiscriminate abuse of America and her institutions, for he could not forget that it was there he first looked up to the blue heavens above, and at the green earth beneath him; that there still reposed the ashes of a beloved mother, of a father, and of sisters. 1 No, endeared to his heart were the blue hills and the shores of his fatherland. (Hear, hear, and applause.) But while he should not deal in indiscriminate abuse, neither should he indulge in fulsome flattery. American slavery was one of those great evils which require to be attacked by all the efforts of mind and heart, and the man who threw a lance at it should see that it is charged with fire as well as with truth. He acknowledged the greatness of America in energy, intellect, and activity. Look at her; a nation born in a day! Look at her giving culture and education to her people, and here there was something sublime, something great. But if he acknowledged her to be great, he condemned her the more. (Hear, hear.) He had heard it said that America would abolish slavery if she could.

-367-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 612

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.