The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1

By C. Peter Ripley | Go to book overview

64.
James Watkins to Editor, Aris's Birmingham Gazette 18 May 1854

James Watkins was one of the many fugitive slaves driven from America by passage of the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850. Watkins arrived in Britain during 1851 and solicited money to purchase his family by lecturing on the "horrors of Slavery." During 1854 Watkins's family joined him in England. His willingness to collect funds according to preferred British practice was an important element of his success. Watkins allowed Joseph Crook, M.P. for Bolton, and Henry Van Wart, an American merchant living at Bath, to act as his sponsors. The two men handled Watkins's financial arrangements, thereby insuring the integrity of the process and boosting the confidence of potential contributors. Watkins's 18 May 1854 letter thanked British donors for helping to free his family. J. Rennie to Louis Alexis Chamerovzow, 14 July 1854, British Empire MSS, UkOxU-Rh; Blassingame, Slave Testimony, xxxv.

90 Bath-row [ Birmingham?, England] May 18, 1854

SIR: 1

Will you permit me 2 to inform my numerous friends of Birmingham and the surrounding district, that through their great kindness for which I sincerely thank them, I have been enabled to purchase the freedom of three of my brothers and sisters, by remittance kindly forwarded through Joseph Crookes, 3 Esq. M.P. for Bolton, free of charge besides 538 dollars sent through an American merchant of this town.

A further piece of good fortune for which I have to express my thanks is, that they have enabled me to send for my wife and family (two girls and one boy); and though, when she arrived at New York, the packet refused to accommodate her on account of her color, the American merchant just alluded to kindly and nobly interfered on my behalf, and secured her and my children a very comfortable passage by the packet City of Manchester, instead of the unfortunate City of Glasgow, by which they were to have come. I shall ever feel my obligation to him, and to all those christian friends whose generous sympathy has enabled me to receive my dear wife and little ones in this blessed land of freedom, where none can invade our peaceful and happy home.

I am sure my friends will be glad to hear that they are now under my protection, and that shortly I intend to commence some little business in this town, by which I hope to secure a honest livelihood for myself and

-395-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 612

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.