The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1

By C. Peter Ripley | Go to book overview

74.
Speech by Sarah P. Remond Delivered at the Red Lion Hotel, Warrington, England 2 February 1859

The success of Sarah Remond's first Warrington lecture occasioned a second on Monday evening, 31 January 1859, at the Music Hall. A small admission charge prevented the overcrowding of the first meeting. Before leaving Warrington, Remond gave a third lecture on 2 February, at a noon meeting of women in the assembly room of the Red Lion Hotel. Robert Gaskell introduced Remond by reading her 31 January lecture and asking those in attendance to sign it. Fatigued and slightly ill, Remond spoke only briefly. She was followed by Emily Gaskell, who encouraged local support for the Boston Anti-Slavery Bazaar, gave examples of northern racial prejudice, and solicited contributions for Remond. Remond's efforts in Warrington encouraged 3,525 local residents to sign an address condemning American slavery and to donate $100 to the American Anti-Slavery Society. WT, 29 January, 5 February 1859; Lib, 11 March 1859; WS, 5 February 1859.

Miss REMOND then spoke, and her remarks chiefly bore on the sufferings and indignities which were perpetrated on her sisters in America, and the fearful amount of licentiousness which everywhere pervaded the Southern States. This fact would be best realized when she stated that there were 800,000 mulattoes in the Southern States of America--the fruits of licentiousness--bringing nothing but desolation in the hearts of the mother who bore them, and it ought to have brought shame to the fathers; but there was no respect for morality while the ministers of the gospel and statesmen of the south did not set an example which even their slaves could follow. She preferred, however, giving them unquestionable facts instead of personal statements which she might offer, and to this end read several extracts from books, all proving that the system of slavery and the immorality it engenders is eating out the vitals of the country, and destroying domestic happiness, not only amongst the subject race, but amongst the families of slaveholders. She then read a graphic description of a young and beautiful girl at a slave sale. The auctioneer was offered 1,000 dollars for her at first. He then expatiated on the superior education she possessed, and 600 dollars more were offered, and lastly he commented on the religious and moral principles she held, when she rose to 2,000 dollars, at which she was knocked down. Thus 1,000 dollars were paid for her blood, bone, and sinew, 600 for her improved intellect, and 400 more for the profession of the reli-

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