The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1

By C. Peter Ripley | Go to book overview

Index
Page numbers in boldface indicate the main discussion of the subject.
Abbey Church (Paisley, Scot.), 67n
Abbott, Wilson R., 338n
Abeokuta, 448
Aberdeen, Scot., 16
Abolitionists: dissension among, 385n;
Dred Scott decision opposed by, 441- 42n; fugitive slaves aided by, 228-30, 236n, 244n, 298n, 347n, 358n, 365n, 377-78n, 383, 385n; imprisoned, 174n, 228-30, 298n, 461n; Kansas free-state movement supported by, 298n; prejudice among, 34, 300n, 391-92; women, 101-2n, 152-53n, 216, 223n, 225- 26n, 299n, 339n, 346, 347n, 379-81, 440-41n, 462-63, 472n, 480n, 513- 14. See also Antislavery; Black abolitionists; Britain; Garrisonian abolitionists; Gradual emancipation; Immediate emancipation; Political antislavery
Aborigines Protection Society, 76n, 508n
Abrahams (clergyman), 46, 48, 51n
Act of Union (1800), 50n, 522n
Act of 1802, 218n
Adams, Charles Francis, 505n
Adams, William, 76-77n
Adams Express, 174n
"Address to the Colored Men of Connecticut" (Nott), 128n
"Address to the Slaves of the United States" (Garnet), 154n, 226-27n
"Address to White Professing Christians of the United States" (BFASS), 119n
Advertiser ( Wilmington, N.C.), 325n
Africa: blacks in, 340-41; church missions in, 227n; cotton production in, 489; development of, 280-81; E. Jones's missionary work in, 354n; missions in, 48, 278-80. See also West Africa; Liberia
African Aid Society, 243n, 451n, 488, 501, 503, 507n, 508n, 516, 524
African and Sierra Leone Weekly Advertiser (Freetown, Sierra Leone), 354n
African Beneficial Hall ( Philadelphia, Pa.), destroyed in riot, 124n
African Civilization Society ( England), 49n, 508n
African Civilization Society ( New York, N.Y.), 118n, 141n, 227n, 310n, 352n, 415n, 497, 501, 503, 504n, 506n, 507n
African Educational Society School ( Pittsburgh, Pa.), 448n
African Free School ( New York, N.Y.), 58n, 78n, 82n, 147n, 226n, 300n, 352n, 353n
African immigration, 5, 41-42n, 151n, 449n, 451-52n, 497, 501-2, 506-8n, 515-16; AFASS endorses, 90n; blacks oppose, 74, 507n; blacks support, 28, 43n, 77n, 141n, 227n, 352n, 447-48, 450-51n, 504n, 524, 526n. See also West Africa
African Institution, 49n
African Masonic Lodge, 121n
African Methodist Episcopal church, 110, 118n, 122n, 123n, 125-26n; in Canada, 110; founding of, 123n
African Methodist Episcopal Church Magazine ( New York, N.Y.), 123n
African Methodist Episcopal Zion church, 110, 122n, 338n, 414n
African Mission School ( Hartford, Conn.), 354n
African Repository ( New York, N.Y.), 41n
African School ( Philadelphia, Pa.), 83n
African slave trade, 49n, 543n; British efforts to curtail, 502, 506n, 517
African Slave Trade and Its Remedy, The (Buxton), 49
African Society for Mutual Relief, 75n
African Times ( London, Eng.), 507n, 508n
Africanus, Selah M., 128n
Agency Committee, 50n, 57n
Ahab (king), 434n
Alabama, slave laws in, 55
Alabama (ship), 475n
Alaska, 525n
Albany Patriot ( N.Y.), 230n
Albright, Arthur, 557, 559n
Alexander, George W., 276, 362, 503, 508n
Alexander, Sarah, 508n
Alexander I (czar of Russia), 281n
Alexandria Seminary ( Alexandria, Va.), 443n
Alfred (slave), 319, 384n
Aliened American ( Cleveland, Ohio), 118n, 526n
Allen, Anne, 100, 102n
Allen, Harriet Aurilla, 453, 456n
Allen, Joseph, 164n
Allen, Julia Maria, 456n
Allen, Loguen Patrick, 456n
Allen, Mary E. King, 16, 346, 347n, 355, 358n, 370n, 454, 491
Allen, Richard (AME bishop), 78n, 110, 119n, 122-23n
Allen, Richard ( Dublin abolitionist), 85-86, 87n, 98, 102n

-575-

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