China, Taiwan, and the Offshore Islands: Together with an Implication for Outer Mongolia and Sino-Soviet Relations

By Thomas E. Stolper | Go to book overview

the PRC was willing to coexist peacefully with the United States if it would cease occupying a part of China and using it as a base from which to threaten the rest of China. 84 He also said that China's proposal for collective peace in Asia did not exclude any country outside Asia. 85 Placed alongside harsh attacks on American policy, such words could easily be interpreted as attempts to isolate the United States from its allies, but they were probably also meant to keep the door open to negotiations with Washington. There was one other conciliatory gesture by the PRC, apparently connected with the arrival in London at the end of October of the first PRC chargé d'affaires. 86 Several Americans had been aboard the British airliner shot down near Hainan on July 23. 87 Although Peking returned Washington's notes demanding reparation, 88 the American families involved were eventually compensated by Peking, 89 evidently as a result of Peking's full acceptance of the £367,000 blanket claim submitted by London. 90


Notes
1.
The word "regulated" is reportedly Mao's. See NYT, August 25, 1954, pp. 1 and 5.
2.
RMRB, NCNA, July 9, 1954, in SCMP, No. 845, p. 30.
3.
RMRB, NCNA, July 22, 1954, in SCMP, No. 854, p. 17. A month later, NCNA was still maintaining that "never before has U.S. imperialism been as isolated as now." August 29, 1954, in SCMP, No. 880, p. 6.
4.
RMRB, July 23, NCNA, July 24, 1954, in SCMP, No. 855, p. 4.
5.
Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS), Propaganda Report, 23 September 1954, "The Formosa Liberation Campaign", p. 2.
6.
NCNA, August 1, 1954, in SCMP, No. 860, pp. 1-3.
7.
Important Documents Concerning the Question of Taiwan ( Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1955), p. 126.
8.
Ibid., p. 124
9.
Ibid., p. 111, quoted by Jan Kalicki, in The Pattern of Sino-American Crises ( London & New York: Cambridge University Press, 1975), p. 128.
10.
Important Documents Concerning the Question of Taiwan (note 7, above), pp. 13-17.
11.
U.S. Department of State, American Foreign Policy, 1950-1955, Vol. II, p. 2468.
12.
This important change was made in late 1978, when the United States and the PRC agreed to establish diplomatic relations. Cf. Peking Review, Vol. 21, No. 31 ( August 4, 1978), p. 3, and Vol. 21, No. 51 ( December 22, 1978), p. 3. Richard Ford, author of A Piece of My Heart ( New York: Harper & Row, 1976) and The Ultimate Good Luck ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1981) is a writer whose mind has not been numbed by constant reading of polemics. In 1975, he asked of an earlier version of this book why the word "liberate" kept appearing in places where "take" or "capture" would be more objective. Appropriate substitutions have since been made.
13.
Press conference, August 17, 1954, in U.S., President, Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States, Dwight D. Eisenhower, 1954 ( Washington: United States Government Printing Office, 1960), pp. 718-19.

-44-

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China, Taiwan, and the Offshore Islands: Together with an Implication for Outer Mongolia and Sino-Soviet Relations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • I- The Analytical Framework 3
  • II- The Context Of Events 15
  • III- Propaganda And Action 34
  • Notes 44
  • IV- The Mutual Defense Treaty 49
  • V- Climax of the 1954-55 Taiwan Affair 66
  • VI- Continuing Confrontation 81
  • VII- Movement Toward Negotiation 95
  • VIII- Sequels 114
  • IX- Chinese Irredentism Vis-àvis the United States and the Soviet Union 140
  • Appendix 149
  • Bibliography 155
  • Index 163
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