Ideology and the Social Sciences

By Graham C. Kinloch; Raj P. Mohan | Go to book overview
1. Ideas have tended to move from relatively homogeneous myths dominant in earlier societies, through a variety of religions, to a plurality of ideologies and dominant belief in science typical of many modern societies.
2. Science tends to question everything while ideology takes its illusions for granted. Nevertheless, science is often used in ideological ways.
3. Social science largely tends to reflect a particular ideology and is professionally dominated by European practitioners.

Based on this analysis, we conclude that ideologies of whatever type will probably continue to be a part of society, no matter how "modern" or "developed" society might appear to be. Nevertheless, it is important to make the social sciences more culturally diverse in order to develop a broader-based consensus regarding knowledge and its interpretation; otherwise, our "professional" insights will continue largely to reflect the narrow backgrounds and interests of Europeans rather than humankind as a whole. To maintain such ideological narrowmindedness would continue to make our enterprise highly ethnocentric and conceptually distorted. It is clear that ideology and increasing diversity are closely connected and that both should be valued and maximized in the social sciences in order to gain a fuller and more accurate view of our complex world and the need for multidimensional understanding, research, and solutions to contemporary social problems. The contributions to follow tend to reflect this concern in their emphasis on academic and methodological diversity and democracy, the importance of "popular discourse," the major issue of growing inequality, and the need for heterogeneous societal and academic experiences in graduate education. Intellectual and academic diversity, rather than narrow homogeneity, is clearly called for in these analyses.

Finally, it is no possible to predict whether the day will ever come when all people will agree that they have at last found the ultimate meaning of life, but at present it appears unlikely. However, it should be noted that the quest that drove humankind from the first myths, to religion, to philosophy, and to the creation of an almost endless variety of ideologies continues in the case of social science. We also appear to need myth-makers, whatever we call them--sages, shamans, priests, philosophers, intellectuals, or ideologues ( Mohan 1987: ix). Consequently, ideologies will probably remain a part of human society, despite their obvious limitations.


REFERENCES

Aiken Henry D. 1956. The Age of Ideology: The 19th Century Philosophers. New York: Mentor.

Becker Carl L. 1932. The Heavenly City of Eighteenth Century Philosophers. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

-16-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ideology and the Social Sciences
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 208

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.