Ideology and the Social Sciences

By Graham C. Kinloch; Raj P. Mohan | Go to book overview

10
Academic Portraits: Autobiography and Scientific Censorship in American Sociology

Loïc Wacquant

It is well known that American sociologists reveal little of themselves in their works. Secure in the Weberian dichotomy between the scholar and the politician, raised on the liberal antinomy between the public and the private, armed with the canons of positivist epistemology,1 they affect a respect, as much in their teaching practice as in their writings, for an impermeable separation between work and personal life. And it is with good reason that they have the reputation of knowing how to "efface" the man (or the woman) in favor of the work: a character missing from her own texts, the U.S. sociologist is duty bound to be detached, neutral, impartial, her writings impersonal and devoid of emotions, her relation to the object eclipsed.2 If the "knowledge interest" that moves her is allowed to be evoked, it is in a preface or in a "methodological" appendix (especially in studies based on participant observation),3 where the motivations that have led the author to invest herself in a certain subject, and the biographical or academic circumstances that have pushed her to embrace a certain method or a certain paradigm, are traditionally consigned to a few paragraphs, and where the persons, institutions, or events that contributed to fashioning her scientific activity are cataloged in the form of stereotypical acknowledgments.

This is to say that Matilda White Riley takes a few liberties with one of the most respected norms of the field by assembling, in Sociological Lives, the account given of their careers by eight of the most eminent representatives of the profession at the 1986 meeting of the American Sociological Association.4 As Robert Merton remarks in his introductory chapter to

-147-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ideology and the Social Sciences
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 208

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.