Ideology and the Social Sciences

By Graham C. Kinloch; Raj P. Mohan | Go to book overview

with them effectively. Crucial in both cases were those life experiences that "broke through" generally accepted views of local situations as "natural" or "the way of things." These breaks included experiences such as personal discrimination, social movements, and radically different types of society. Personal perceptions were changed radically as a result: everyday life, academia, and professional sociology would never be viewed the same way again. In this manner, radical changes in biography had a major impact on their views of professional ideology. While it is impossible to overcome an individual's attitudinal boundaries completely, these kinds of experience are invaluable in breaking through these barriers. Heterogeneous rather than narrow societal experiences are vital to such discoveries and need to be built into the discipline and its training programs. Professional ideologies are clearly varied and dynamic rather than homogeneous and static. They should be recognized and encouraged as such.


REFERENCES

Bell D. A. 1992. Faces at the Bottom of the Well: The Permanence of Racism. New York: Basic Books.

Blauner R. 1990. Black Lives, White Lives: Three Decades of Race Relations in America. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Gates, H. L. 1995. Colored People: A Memoir. New York: Knopf.

Gouldner A. W. 1968. "The Sociologist as Partisan: Sociology and the Welfare State." American Sociologist 3 (May): 103-16.

Horowitz I. L. 1967. "Mainliners and Marginals: The Human Shape of Sociological Theory." In Sociological Theory: Inquiries and Paradigms, edited by L. Gross . New York: Harper and Row.

Kinloch Graham C. 1981. Ideology and Contemporary Sociology Theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

-----. 1985. "The Tension Between Scientific and Reformist Sociology Reflected in Professional Debate." Journal of Human Thought 20: 50-58.

Mills C. Wright. 1961. The Sociological Imagination. New York: Grove Press.

-191-

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