CHAPTER 26 How the Churches Were Broken

ARCHBISHOP Josef Beran of Prague, a tiny, gently smiling figure beneath the tall jeweled miter on his head and the gold and silver stole over his shoulders, gripped the pulpit railing, leaned forward and silver in a loud, clear voice, but tense with emotion, to three thousand men and women pressed into Strahov church and overflowing into the monastery garden outside.

"I don't know how many more times I will be able to speak to you," the archbishop said. "Whatever happens, don't believe that I have surrendered." A murmur and a wave of sobs went through the church as he paused.

It was June 18, 1949. Negotiations between the Roman Catholic church and the Communist state had broken down. The Czechoslovak Council of Bishops had found a police-installed microphone hidden in their conference room. They had protested to President Gottwald. They had made public a series of letters to cabinet ministers protesting against the suppression of Catholic newspapers and periodicals, interference with Catholic education and other efforts to force the church out of public life and back behind the walls of its churches. The government's insistence that it would administer the entire educational system "in the spirit of Marxism" made further church-state negotiations "vain and hopeless," the bishops had said.

The government, for its part, had arrested about 150 priests on charges of various kinds of antistate activity. A week before the archbishop's appearance in Strahov church, it had founded a so-called Catholic Action which was supposed to win support among the lower clergy and Catholic laymen and to bring pressure to bear on the bishops to submit to the government's demands. Finally, the government had, only three days earlier, placed Archbishop Beran's palace under police surveillance and

-301-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Anatomy of a Satellite
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 518

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.