The Story of Lucca

By Janet Ross; Nelly Erischen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII
The Interior of the Duomo and its Monuments

"O Crux ave, Spes unica."

LATIN HYMN.

THE interior of the Duomo is intimate and lovable rather than imposing. To enter it is like meeting a friend. It inspires happiness rather than awe, pleases rather than delights.

In spite of a greater unity of effect the battle of the styles is waged no less keenly here than outside, but with one great difference. There the Gothic element is subordinate to the Romanesque, here it predominates. We seem at first to have entered a purely Gothic church. And as the ground plan is a Latin cross, the nave lofty, and the transepts important, the conclusion can hardly be avoided. Yet it is not wholly Gothic. The details are hopelessly intermingled. A pointed triforium with elaborately traceried windows rests upon massive round arches. Others span the roof, but pointed vaultings spring from them. In the aisles the windows are pointed, in the clerestory round. The apse alone has unity of style, and the eye would rest happily there even without the additional witchery of the rich colour in its windows. Contrasting with the cool fire of their deep greens, and blues, and purples the golden shrine of the Volto Santo, surrounded by a fire-fly tangle of burning tapers, glows like the sun. It is the living heart of the Duomo, and to it the

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The Story of Lucca
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Chapter II 25
  • Chapter III 51
  • Chapter V 92
  • Chapter VI - A First Impression of Lucca 105
  • Chapter VII - The Duomo and Its History 121
  • Chapter VII - The Interior of the Duomo and Its Monuments 151
  • Chapter IX - The Churches, Walls, and Towers Of Lucca 189
  • Chapter X - Pictures, Palaces, and Books 247
  • Chapter XI - Beyond the Walls of Lucca 290
  • Chapter XII - The Bagni Di Lucca 328
  • Index 355
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