Revolution and Change in Central and Eastern Europe: Political, Economic, and Social Challenges

By Minton F. Goldman | Go to book overview

Other Balkan Countries. Albania's relations with other Balkan countries are somewhat better. President Berisha has said that Albania has good relations with other former Yugoslav republics, notably Slovenia and Croatia, which do not want a Serb-Albanian conflict over Kosovo. Berisha also spoke of very good Albanian relations with Turkey, where a large Albanian minority is trying to act as a bridge builder between the two countries and heal the wounds of centuries of occupation by the Ottoman Empire. Helping the cause of reconciliation is the fact that Turkey has refrained from on against its small Albanian community.


Conclusions

President Ramiz Alia deserves credit for Albania's peaceful transition from communist authoritarianism to pluralistic parliamentary government. He was a very skillful leader who showed a degree of flexibility that set him apart from other communist leaders in Central and Eastern Europe, such as Romania's Ceauşescu, East Germany's Honecker, Czechoslovakia's Jakeš, and Bulgaria's Zhivkov.

But Albanian political liberalization was very slow and gradual, making it appear at times that the country would never completely discard communist rule, largely because most of Albanian society, which was rural and conservative, was not easily won over to the liberalization policies advocated by the political opposition based in the cities. The process of change, however, continued because the Alia leadership saw reform as the only chance the Albanian Communist Party had of preserving its leadership of the country into the 1990s. Alia and other Albanian communist leaders were alive to the implications for them of communist collapse everywhere else in the region, as well as in the Soviet Union.

In the postcommunist era, however, severe economic hardship is taxing the country's new democratic order to the breaking point. Despite accusations by his critics that he is becoming increasingly authoritarian--as, indeed, he is, partly in response to the pluralistic and conflict-ridden political environment that makes it difficult for him to lead and reform his country--PresidentBerisha is not a dictator. He is committed to the democratic process and does not seem ready to sacrifice the newly won liberal political institutions for the sake of moving quickly through the reforms needed to improve economic performance and raise standards of living.

So far he has managed to chart an intelligent course through the complex, unpredictable, and potentially dangerous diplomatic waters of Balkan international politics. Under his leadership, Albania seems to be moving away from the old isolationist order and developing new links with foreign countries, especially in the West, that can help Albania economically and enhance its security.

-82-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Revolution and Change in Central and Eastern Europe: Political, Economic, and Social Challenges
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - Roots and Causes of Communist Collapse 3
  • Conclusions 22
  • 2 - Problems of Postcommunist Development 23
  • Conclusions 51
  • 3 - Albania 53
  • Conclusions 82
  • 4 - Bulgaria 83
  • Conclusions 111
  • 5 - From Czechoslovakia to the Czech and Slovak Republics 113
  • Conclusions 152
  • 6 - East Germany 155
  • Conclusions 178
  • 7 - Hungary 181
  • Conclusions 216
  • 8 - Poland 219
  • Conclusions 263
  • 9 - Romania 265
  • Conclusions 298
  • 10 - Yugoslavia-----Collapse and Disintegration 299
  • Conclusions 331
  • 11 - Yugoslavia--The Bosnian Civil War 341
  • Conclusions 389
  • Conclusions 391
  • Notes 405
  • Bibliography 453
  • Index 471
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 498

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.