Biological and Neuropsychological Mechanisms: Life-Span Developmental Psychology

By Hayne W. Reese; Michael D. Franzen | Go to book overview

ethnicity. More equal opportunities reduce arbitrary environmental differences, thereby highlighting genetic variability.

If we want a developmental theory that accounts for observations about family effects on children, it behooves us to include genetic variation, nonshared environments, and genotype-environment correlations. Evidence shows that family resemblances are due largely to genetic similarity among people born into the same families. Small common environmental effects -- those due to being reared in the same family -- have been found, and they would doubtlessly be larger if very deprived families were included. For most families in North American and European populations, however, environmental differences among them have very small effects on their children's development. If socialization researchers wish to dispute these conclusions, they must test their ideas with informative research designs. Advocacy for social reform cannot be substituted for scientific theory and research. Respect for individual diversity would be a desirable outcome of this debate.


REFERENCES

Baumrind D. ( 1993). "The average expectable environment is not good enough: A response to Scarr". Child Development, 64, 1299-1317.

Bouchard T. J., Jr., Lykken D. T., Tellegen A., & McGue M. (in press). "Genes, drives, environment and experience: EPD theory" -- revised. In C. Benbow & D. Lubinski (Eds.), From psychometrics to giftedness: Essays in honor of Julian Stanley. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Bouchard T. J., Jr., & McGue M. ( 1990). "Genetic and rearing environmental influences on adult personality: An analysis of adopted twins reared apart". Journal of Personality, 58, 263-292.

Breland K., & Breland M. ( 1961). "The misbehavior of organisms". American Psychologist, 16, 681-684.

Bronfenbrenner U., Lenzenweger M. F., & Ceci S. J. ( 1993). Heredity, environment and the question "how?": A new theoretical perspective for the 1990s. Unpublished manuscript.

Buss D. M. ( 1992). Strategic individual differences: The evolutionary psychology of selection, evocation, and manipulation. Manuscript prepared for the Dahlem Workshop: What are the Mechanisms Mediating the Genetic and Environmental Determinants of Behavior?, Dahlem, Germany.

Cronbach L. J. ( 1957). "Two disciplines of scientific psychology". American Psychologist, 12, 671-684.

Degler C. N. ( 1991). In search of human nature: The decline and revival of Darwinism in American social thought. New York: Oxford University Press.

Dobzhansky T. ( 1941). Genetics and the origin of species. New York: Columbia University Press.

Ernst S., & Angst J. ( 1985). Birth order. Frankfurt: Springer-Verlag.

Fischbein S. ( 1980). "IQ and social class". Intelligence, 4, 51-63.

Fuller J., & Thompson R. ( 1960). Foundations of behavior genetics. St Louis, MO: Mosby.

Goodman R., & Stevenson J. ( 1991). "Parental criticism and warmth toward unrecognizedmonozygotic twins"

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Biological and Neuropsychological Mechanisms: Life-Span Developmental Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 262

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.