Preparatory States & Processes: Proceedings of the Franco-American Conference, Ann Arbor, Michigan, August, 1982

By Sylvan Kornblum; Jean Requin | Go to book overview

are still able to differentiate between degrees in spatial uncertainty, which indicates preservation of prediction mechanisms. In any case a systematic approach to this problem would involve analysis of learning evolution and variations of S- R compatibility. Second, no obvious disorganization of the programming stage was observed after DN exclusion but the inability to finely tune velocity and to use spatial maps appropriately were missing. Although part of the motor impairment observed during the execution phase may be related to a defective control of the ongoing movement, the data obtained in these experiments suggest incorrect velocity programming and erroneous spatial specification of the limb trajectory. A third hypothesis may be put forward according to which the neocerebellum participates directly in increasing the efficiency of motor control. In this connection, attention must be paid to postural reorganization preceding the execution of movement. It has been suggested that the development of the neocerebellum in primates might be related to the need for new posturo-kinetic patterns ( Massion & Sasaki, 1979). The DN could be directly involved through subcortical influences ( Schultz et al., 1979) in the control of axial and proximal muscles responsible for postural changes preceding the initiation of limb movement. The specificity of such a postural setting, which could increase the ac­7 cessibility of central command to motor systems ( Requin, 1980), has still however to be tested.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This work was partly supported by CNRS grant (ATP Neurobiologie du système nerveux central) and INSERM grant (PRC Santé mentale et cerveau).


REFERENCES

Allen G. I., & Tsukahara N. "Cerebro-cerebellar communication systems". Physiological Review, 1974, 54, 957-1006.

Beaubaton D., & Trouche E. "Participation of the cerebellar dentate nucleus in the control of a goal directed movement in monkeys. Effects of reversible or premanent dentate lesion on the duration and accuracy of a pointing response". Experimental Brain Research, 1982, 46, 127-138.

Benita M., Conde H., Dormont J. F., & Schmied A. "Effects of ventrolateral thalamic nucleus cooling on initiation of forelimb ballistic flexion movements by conditioned cats". Experimental Brain Research, 1979, 34, 435-452.

Botwinick J., & Thompson L. W. "Premotor and motor components of reaction time". Journal of Experimental Psvchology, 1966, 71, 9-15.

Brooks V. B. Control of intended limb movement by the lateral and intermediate cerebellum. In H. Asanuma & V. J. Wilson (Eds.). Integration in the nervous system. Tokyo, New York: Igaku- Shoin, 1979.

Brooks V. B., Kozlovskaya I. B., Atkin A., Horvarth F. E., & Uno M. "Effects of cooling dentate nucleus on tracking task performance in monkeys". Journal of Neurophysiology, 1973, 36, 974-995.

Brooks V. B., & Thach. W. T. Cerebellar control of posture and movement. In V. B. Brooks

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