Reflections on 100 Years of Experimental Social Psychology

By Aroldo Rodrigues; Robert V. Levine | Go to book overview

growth and new adventures. The way we train them will determine what happens in social psychology over the next 100 years. Is high-impact methodology really in danger of becoming a lost art, like Egyptian embalming techniques? Perhaps not. It is possible that my concern is unwarranted. I don't want to exaggerate. I simply want to sound an early warning signal. The truth is that although the frequency of high-impact experimentation has diminished sharply since the 1970s, it has not totally disappeared from the scene. Moreover, its use is not confined to us old fogies. Indeed, on occasion even I experience a surge of encouragement when, at conferences or upon picking up a journal, I see that a bright young scientist has investigated a difficult problem using the appropriate, time-consuming, ethically sensitive, high-impact methodology. It gives me hope that this methodology will survive. My hope for the future of our discipline is that this training will do more than survive, that it will expand. In my judgment, it is vital that we train all our graduate students to employ a wide range of methodologies so that they will never be dissuaded from investigating any problem because of lack of expertise.


References

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Aronson, E., Carlsmith, J. M., & Darley, J. ( 1963). "The effects of expectancy on volunteering for an unpleasant experience". Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 66, 220-224.

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