Reflections on 100 Years of Experimental Social Psychology

By Aroldo Rodrigues; Robert V. Levine | Go to book overview
3.
Theory and research on humor is discussed by Allport ( 1924) but rarely in textbooks from the 1970s to the present.
4.
They also foreshadow the concept of "relative deprivation."
5.
An exception is the increasingly active relation with political science facilitated by the International Society of Political Psychology.
6.
The Research Center for Group Dynamics at the University of Michigan continues theory-research programs on group processes and more recently has initiated a program on cultural social psychology. It should also be noted that there are widely circulated journals that specialize in group and organizational psychology.
7.
Of course not all uniformities are the result of social influence. Thus when most pedestrians carry umbrellas during a downpour, it is individual utility that underlies the uniform behavior.
8.
The implicit assumption in most of the social psychology research literature that confirmed hypotheses are universal may in part arise from a misinterpretation of the meaning of statistical significance: the confusion that reliability based on repeated random sampling from a hypothetical population means that a finding is valid across the human population.
9.
To be sure, the boundary between the material and the nonmaterial is not always clear. The believer in a cherry tree twig's ability to locate underground springs is convinced there is a physical process involved.
10.
A general approach to the understanding of how objective science, economics, and institutionalized systems of beliefs are transformed into psychological concepts can be seen in the original work on social representations ( Moscovici, 1984). The importance of role behavior in authority structures was illuminated by the ingenious, verissimo prison experiment of Zimbardo ( 1973).

References

Allport, F. ( 1924). Social ps``ychology. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

-----. ( 1933). Institutional behavior. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

-----. ( 1940). An event system theory of collective action: With illustrations from economic and political phenomena and the production of war. Journal of Social Psychology, 11,417-445.

-----. ( 1962). A structuronomic conception of behavior. Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 1, 3-30.

Asch, S. ( 1952). Social psychology. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Asch, S., Block, H., & Hertzman, M. ( 1938). Studies in the principles of judgments and attitudes. Journal of Psychology, 5, 219-251.

Berkowitz, L. ( 1962). Aggression -- a social psychological analysis. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Brewer, M. ( 1997). On the origins of human nature. In C. McGarty & A. Haslam (Eds.), The message of social psychology. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell.

Brown, J. E ( 1936). Psychology and the social order. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Brown, R. ( 1954). Mass phenomena. In G. Lindzey (Ed.), Handbook of social psychology. Cambridge, MA: Addison-Wesley.

Buss, A. ( 1979). On the relationship between causes and reasons. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 37, 1458-1461.

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