Reflections on 100 Years of Experimental Social Psychology

By Aroldo Rodrigues; Robert V. Levine | Go to book overview

tainments does not mean that on the whole we humans are deficient in the rationality department. Perhaps the next 100 years will produce knowledge that specifies the circumstances and conditions under which we are irrational and those under which we are not. Perhaps then we will agree on the realms of rationality and irrationality of human nature and proceed in our research in a cumulative fashion. From all we now know, it must be fortunately the case that we humans are both rational and irrational, and that is what makes psychology fascinating.


Notes
1.
For irrational reasons, I do not discuss the positions of this book's contributors and would not presume to qualify my own. And of course those whom I have listed are there only for illustrative purposes. Many others -- all of us, in fact -- could be considered for their rationalist or irrationalist views. But the scope of this chapter does not allow an exhaustive treatment.
2.
"Rationalization" was a term first used by E. Jones ( 1908) to describe Freud's notion that irrational actions can be "justified by distorting the mental processes concerned and providing a false explanation that has a plausible ring of rationality."

References

Allport, G. W. ( 1954). The historical background of modern social psychology. In G. Lindzey (Ed.), Handbook of social psychology. Cambridge, MA: Addison-Wesley.

____. ( 1985). The historical background of social psychology. In G. Lindzey & E. Aronson (Eds.), Handbook of social psychology ( 3rd ed., pp. 1-46). New York: Random House.

Aristotle. ( 1973). De sensu and De memoria ( G. R.T. Ross, Trans.). New York: Arno.

____. ( 1991). The art of rhetoric ( H. C. Lawson-Tancred, Trans.). London: Penguin.

Aronson, E., & Mills, J. ( 1959). The effect of severity of initiation on liking for the group. Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 59, 177-181.

Asch, S. E. ( 1948). The doctrine of suppression, prestige, and imitation in social psychology. Psychological Review, 55, 250-276.

____. ( 1952). Social psychology. New York: Prentice-Hall.

Bandura, A. ( 1982). The self and mechanisms of agency. In J. Suls (Ed.), Psychological perspectives on the self (Vol. 1). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

Bartlett, E. C. ( 1932). Remembering. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Brehm, J. ( 1966). A theory of psychological reactance. New York: Academic Press.

Bruner, J. S. ( 1951). Personality dynamics and the process of perceiving. In R. R. Blake & G. V. Ramsey (Eds.), Perception: An approach to personality. New York: Ronald Press.

____. ( 1990). Acts of meaning. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Brunswick, E. ( 1939). Probability as a determiner of rat behavior. Journal of Experimental Psychology, 25, 175-197.

Camerer, C. E ( 1995). Individual decision making. In J. H. Kagel & A. E. Roth (Eds.), The handbook of experimental economics (pp. 587-703). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Cooley, C. H. ( 1902). Human nature and the social order. New York: Scribner's.

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