Reflections on 100 Years of Experimental Social Psychology

By Aroldo Rodrigues; Robert V. Levine | Go to book overview

About the Editors and Contributors

Elliot Aronson was born in 1932 in Revere, Massachusetts. He received a B.A. in 1954 from Brandeis, where he worked with Abraham Maslow; an M.A. in 1956 from Wesleyan, where he worked with David McClelland; and a Ph.D. in 1959 from Stanford, where he worked with Leon Festinger. He is currently professor emeritus at the University of California at Santa Cruz. He has taught previously at Harvard, the University of Minnesota, and the University of Texas at Austin. He has written or edited over 120 research articles and seventeen books, among them The Social Animal ( 1973). His prizes include awards from the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Psychological Association, and the Gordon Allport Prize for contributions to prejudice reduction ( 1981). In 1992 he was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was honored with the Distinguished Scientific Career Award by the Society of Experimental Social Psychology in 1995. He has served as president of the Western Psychological Association and president of the Society of Personality and Social Psychology.

Leonard Berkowitz, Vilas Research Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, grew up in New York City and attended New York schools. After serving in the U.S. Air Force, he received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1951 and has been on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin-Madison since 1955, although he has also held visiting positions at Stanford, Oxford, Cornell, Cambridge, the University of Western Australia, and the University of Mannheim. Berkowitz was one of the pioneers in the experimental study of altruism and helping but since 1957 has been engaged mainly in studying situational influences on aggressive behavior, using both laboratory experiments and field interviews with violent offenders in the United States and Britain. The author of about 170 articles and books, most of them concerned with aggression, he was also the editor of the well-known series "Advances in Experimental Social Psychology" (Academic Press) from its inception in 1964 to his retirement from that post in 1989. Berkowitz has been president of the APA's Division of Personality and Social Psychology and the International Society for Research on Aggression, was given Distinguished Scientist Awards by the American Psychological Association and the Society for Experimental Social Psychology, and was recently elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

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