Distant Dominion: Britain and the Northwest Coast of North America, 1579-1809

By Barry M. Gough | Go to book overview

Notes

NOTES TO CHAPTER ONE: TYRANNY OF DISTANCE
1.
N. W. Jones, " Account of Chinese Voyages to the Northwest Coast of America," Indian Bulletin for 1868 ( New York, 1869), p. 8.
2.
Alan Moorehead, Darwin and The Beagle ( London: Hamish Hamilton, 1969), p. 218. See also Harry Morton, The Wind Commands: Sailors and Sailing Ships in the Pacific ( Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 1975), p. 166.
3.
Small merchantmen seldom attempted the Horn even in the 1780's. In 1786, the 50-ton sloop Princess Royal, Master Charles Duncan, R.N., commanding, made a remarkably easy passage round the Horn that was for some time the talk of mariners on the west coast of the Americas.
4.
See Matthew F. Maury, Explanations and Sailing Directions to Accompany the Wind and Current Charts ..., 8th ed., 2 vols. ( Washington, 1858-59), pp. 764-67. By 1869 enough was known concerning winds and currents to enable Maury to list the following distances for sailing ships: England to San Francisco, 130 days; Shanghai to San Francisco, 45 days; San Francisco to Shanghai, 64 days; New South Wales to San Francisco, 43 days; New South Wales to the eastern seaboard of the United States or Europe, 110 days; London to New South Wales via Cape of Good Hope, 124 days. See winds and routes map in Matthew F. Maury, Physical Geography of the Sea and Its Meteorology, new ed. ( London, 1869), plate 8.
5.
Important mid- eighteenth-century advances in scientific navigation were: Hadley's reflecting quadrant, Campbell's sextant, Bird's astronomical quadrant, Knight's azimuth compasses, Ramsden's theodolites, and Harrison's chronometers. See R. A. Skelton, " Captain James Cook as a Hydrographer," Mariner's Mirror 40 ( 1954): 95.
6.
The 1795 regulation may have sufficed for the Royal Navy, but it did not always meet all dietetic needs. Even early in the twentieth century the causes and prevention of scurvy were still being debated. (see " Discussion on the Prevention of Scurvy," British Medical Journal, 4 October 1902, pp. 1023-24). On this subject generally, see Christopher Lloyd, ed., The Health of Seamen ( London: Navy Records Society, 1965), vol. 107. Also, Barbara Burkhardt et al., Sailors & Sauerkraut ( Sidney, B.C.: Gray's Publishing, 1978), pp. 23-26.
7.
Admiral G. A. Ballard, " Cape Horn," Mariner's Mirror3 ( 1945): 144.
8.
Morton, Wind Commands, p. 3.

NOTES TO CHAPTER TWO: PACIFIC PROBES
1.
William Camden, History( 1675 ed.), p. 255(quoted in Sir William Foster, England's Quest of Eastern Trade [ London: A. & C. Black, 1933], p. 64).
2.
Gregory King, " The Naval Trade of England, 1688," in Two Tracts by Gregory King, p. 31(quoted in K. G. Davies, " Joint-Stock Investment in the Late Seventeenth Century," Economic History Review, 2d ser. 4 [ 1952]: 285).
3.
A. P. Newton, " The Beginnings of English Colonization, 1569-1618," Cambridge History of the British Em­pire, 24 vols. ( Cambridge: UniversityPress, 1929), 1: 53

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Distant Dominion: Britain and the Northwest Coast of North America, 1579-1809
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Distant Dominion - Britain and the Northwest Coast of North America, 1579-1809 *
  • Contents *
  • Photographic Credits *
  • Illustrations *
  • Preface *
  • 1: Tyranny of Distance *
  • 2: Pacific Probes *
  • 3: Cook's Reconnaissance *
  • 4: Spanning the Pacific *
  • 5: The Fortune Seekers *
  • 6: Beachhead of Empire *
  • 7: Imperial Dreams and False Starts *
  • 8: Conflicts of Ambition *
  • 9: Dealing with the Dons *
  • 10: The Surveyor-Diplomats *
  • 11: The Overlanders *
  • Epilogue *
  • Abbreviations *
  • Notes *
  • Note on Sources *
  • Select Bibliography *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 190

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.