Ugetsu Monogatari: Tales of Moonlight and Rain: A Complete English Version of the Eighteenth-Century Japanese Collection of Tales of the Supernatural

By Ueda Akinari; Leon M. Zolbrod | Go to book overview

Kaian to establish himself there, after which he changed its former affiliation with the Shingon sect 532 and founded a holy place of Sōtō 533 Zen. This temple still stands today, prosperous and venerated.


IX
WEALTH AND POVERTY
(Himpuku-ron)

In the province of Mutsu 534 in the retinue of Gamō Ujisato 535 there served a warrior by the name of Oka Sanai. 536 His stipend was large. He was widely respected, and his bravery was renowned everywhere east of the barrier. 537 But this samurai behaved indecorously in one detail. 538 His ambition for wealth and rank far exceeded that of the normal military man. Frugality was his guiding principle, and since he made it the watchword of his household he grew rich with the passing years. Whenever he earned a brief respite from his military duties, he found pleasure not in the tea ceremony or burning incense, but rather in his council chamber, where he would spread out many pieces of gold. The satisfaction that he gained from its display exceeded the joy that most people got from moon-viewing parties and picnics under the cherry-blossoms. People frowned on Sanai's behaviour and thought him miserly and boorish. They looked on him with scorn and shunned his company.

Once having heard that a man who had long been employed in his house secretly kept a bar of gold, Sanai summoned him and said,

'In an age of disorder even a jewel from the Kunlun Mountain 539 is worth little more than a tile or a stone. For a person born in times like ours, when one must live by bow and arrow,

-194-

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Ugetsu Monogatari: Tales of Moonlight and Rain: A Complete English Version of the Eighteenth-Century Japanese Collection of Tales of the Supernatural
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 5
  • Translator's Foreword 9
  • Contents 13
  • Illustrations 15
  • Introduction 19
  • Notes on the Introduction 88
  • Volume One 97
  • Preface 97
  • I - White Peak (shiramine) 98
  • II - Chrysanthemum Tryst (kikuka No Chigiri) 109
  • Volume Two 121
  • III - The House Amid the Thickets (asaji Ga Yado) 121
  • IV - The Carp That Came to My Dream (muō No Rigyo) 132
  • Volume Three 139
  • V - Bird of Paradise (buppōsō) 139
  • VI - The Caldron of Kibitsu (kibitsu No Kama) 149
  • Volume Four 161
  • VII - The Lust of the White Serpent (jasei No In) 161
  • Volume Five 185
  • VIII - The Blue Hood (aozukin) 185
  • IX - Wealth and Poverty (himpuku-Ron) 194
  • Notes on the Text 207
  • Appendix 1 - Imperial Succession in the Twelfth Century 261
  • Select Bibliography 277
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