Psychological and Biological Approaches to Emotion

By Nancy L. Stein; Bennett Leventhal et al. | Go to book overview

What drives the child to learn language is that language not only expresses, it also articulates (to paraphrase Taylor), and this is what the forms of affect cannot do. Children learn language in order to express and make explicit the contents of their beliefs and desires. The infants whom we have studied continued to express their feelings affectively, but their capacity for expression was considerably enhanced by the power to use words for articulating the contents of their thoughts and feelings.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

My collaborators on the research that I discuss in this chapter were Richard Beckwith, Joanne Bitetti Capatides, and Jeremie Hafitz; they coauthored the original research reports to which I refer and their ideas as well as their words are prevalent throughout this presentation. In addition, Karin Lifter and Matthew Rispoli made valuable contributions to the research project within which these studies were carried out. Kathleen Bloom contributed to both the data analyses and their interpretation in important ways; I thank her also for her helpful comments on an earlier draft. Financial support for the project was generously provided by The National Science Foundation and The Spencer Foundation.


REFERENCES

Aarsleff H. ( 1976). "An outline of language-origins theory since the Renaissance". In S. Harnad, H. Steklis, & J. Lancaster (Eds.), Origins and evolution of language and speech (Vol. 280, pp. 4-13). New York: Annals of The New York Academy of Sciences.

Adamson L., & Bakeman R. ( 1982). "Affectivity and reference: Concepts, methods, and techniques in the study of communication development of 6- to 18-month-old infants". In T. Field & A. Fogel (Eds.), Emotion and early interaction (pp. 213-236). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Adamson L., & Bakeman R. ( 1985). "Affect and attention: Infants observed with mothers and peers". Child Development, 56, 582-593.

Arnold M. ( 1960). "Emotion and personality", Psychological aspects (Vol. 1). New York: Columbia University.

Beckwith R. ( 1989). "The language of emotion, the emotions, and nominalist bootstrapping". In C. Moore & D. Frye (Eds.), Children's theories of minds. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Bloom L. ( 1973). One word at a time: The use of single word utterances before syntax. The Hague: Mouton.

Bloom L., & Beckwith R. ( 1988). Intentionality and language development. Unpublished manuscript.

Bloom L., & Beckwith R. ( 1989). "Talking with feeling: Integrating affective and linguistic expression in early language development". Cognition and Emotion.

Bloom L., Beckwith R., & Capatides J. ( 1988). "Developments in the expression of affect". Infant Behavior and Development, 11, 169-186.

Bloom L., Beckwith R., Capatides J., & Hafitz J. ( 1988). Expression through affect and words inthe transition from infancy to language

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