The Music of Hindostan

By A. H. Fox Strangways | Go to book overview

The

of the Sa-grāma and Ma-grāma differed from A by the Comma of Didymus. Bharata calls this comma the 'indicative' (pramāṇa) śruti. He uses it for the tuning of the vīṇā.

Take two vīṇās, he says, alike in all respects, and tune them both in the Sa-grāma. On one of them diminish Pa [i.e. lower the note P so as to form our A♮ instead of

by this pramāṇa śruti, but in such a way that the Pa of the Sa-grāma can be put back again. This is the diminution of one śruti. By a second diminution Ga [on one vīṇā] becomes Ri [on the other] and, similarly, Ni becomes Dha. [The second śruti, then, is the difference between the pramāṇa śruti and the Semitone, and the śrutis were therefore not equal in size.] By a third diminution D and R of one vīṇā coincide with P and S of the other; and by a fourth diminution P, M, and S coincide with M, G, and N. This scheme shows the twenty-two śrutis of the two grāmas.

The only thing this establishes is that the śrutis were not equal in size. They are of three sizes: (1) the difference between the major and minor Tone, the pramāṇa śruti, twenty-two Cents; (2) the difference between the minor Tone and the Semitone, seventy Cents; and (3) the difference between the Semitone and the pramāṇa śruti, ninety Cents. He does not tell us in what order these diminutions are to be made; and if we took him literally, and made them successively downwards from each note we should get quite a wrong idea of his scale.

What that scale is we discover from his account of the jātis. There are seven modes (mūrchaṇā) of each of the two grāmas, i. e. fourteen in all; but only seven of these fourteen are in practical use under the name of jātīs, species. In the following table each mode is given as from a common tonic. The constituent units of the Sa-grāma (4 3 2 4 4 3 2) are successively added, and each mūrchaṇa begins on a different one of these notes. The same is done for the Ma-grāma, giving another set of seven mūrchaṇas, each of which differs in one note, and only one, from some mode of the Sa-grāma.

-112-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Music of Hindostan
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Table of Contents viii
  • List of Illustrations xi
  • Chapter I- A Musical Diary 17
  • Chapter II- A Musical Diary (continued) 50
  • Chapter III- Legend, History, and the Present Day 73
  • Chapter IV- The Scale 100
  • Chapter V- Mode 134
  • Chapter VI- RĀga 151
  • Chapter VII- Grace 181
  • Chapter VIII- TĀla Language, Verse, Musical Time 191
  • Chapter IX- Drumming 225
  • Chapter X- The SĀman Chant 246
  • Chapter XI- Form 280
  • Chapter XII- Melody 320
  • Appendix I 343
  • Appendix II 345
  • Bibliography of Works in European Languages 346
  • Glossary and Index 353
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 366

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.