Due to the Weather: Ways the Elements Affect Our Lives

By Abraham Resnick | Go to book overview

10
ICE

Ice is nice--except when it is brought on by a winter storm. An ice storm has the potential to leave homes without power, heat, running water, and even cause structural damage to the building. It can make roads slick and treacherous and generally wreak havoc on the natural environment. Particularly perilous is the toll an ice storm might take in causing deaths and injuries, especially those due to falls.

Ice is the solid form of water. It can form in snow, on water bodies, and as a key composition in glaciers. Water vapor freezing on trees, vines, wires, and all kinds of objects may resemble a glass coating called glaze ice. Hanging icicles can look like stalactites that might be fixed to the roof of a cave. Ice is formed when the water moisture in the air is pure, and the temperature is 32 degrees F (0 degrees C). Impure water, such as seawater, which has salt content, freezes at 27 degrees F. When water freezes, it increases in volume by one-eleventh. That is why water pipes can split open as temperatures rise above freezing unless insulated or warmed. And for the same reason, anti-freeze or alcohol needs to be added to automobile radiators to prevent serious damage to the cooling system of the engine.


SLEET AND FREEZING RAIN

Sleet is generally considered to be frozen rain or rain that freezes into ice pellets during its fall. It usually bounces when hitting a surface and does not stick to objects. It could also be a mixture of rain with hail or snow. Both can place an icy coating on many kinds of manmade or natural surface features and cause a hazard to motorists.


HISTORIC ICE STORMS

Man can produce ice and prevent ice from forming on a very limited scale. However, Mother Nature's powerful ice-making machinery is

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Due to the Weather: Ways the Elements Affect Our Lives
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Part I - Different Kinds of Weather Elements 1
  • 1 - Avalanches 3
  • 2 - Clouds 11
  • 3 - Droughts 17
  • 4 - Dust Storms 25
  • 5 - Floods 31
  • 6 - Fog 39
  • 7 - Hail 45
  • 8 - Humidity 51
  • 9 - Hurricanes/Typhoons 57
  • 10 - Ice 65
  • 11 - Lightning/Thunder 73
  • 12 - Monsoons 79
  • 13 - Mudslides 85
  • 14 - Rainfall 93
  • 15 - Snow 99
  • 16 - Sunshine 107
  • 17 - Temperatures (Cold) 113
  • 18 - Temperatures (Hot) 119
  • 19 - Tornadoes 125
  • 20 - Winds 133
  • Part II - How Weather Affects Us 141
  • 21 - Business 143
  • 22 - Clothing 149
  • 23 - Crime 153
  • 24 - Costums 159
  • 25 - Health 165
  • 26 - History 173
  • 27 - Migration 181
  • 28 - Shelter 187
  • 29 - Sports and Recreation 193
  • 30 - Transportation 203
  • Appendix - Directory of Web Site Contacts 211
  • Index 217
  • About the Author 221
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