Due to the Weather: Ways the Elements Affect Our Lives

By Abraham Resnick | Go to book overview

25
HEALTH

It seems that most people respond positively to queries about their well- being when weather conditions are favorable. When the weather factor tends to be depressing, so too goes their mood and sense of good feeling. It may be that this is an age-long truism, perhaps dating back more than 2,000 years when a very wise Greek physician named Hippocrates uncovered a link between daily and seasonal weather and human health and disease. That is one of the reasons why historians regarded him as the "Father of Medicine." Since his early findings, countless investigations and medical studies have confirmed his conclusion that weather and health are interrelated.

Today medical experts take into account the important effects of weather in making diagnoses and in prescribing therapy for their patients. More than ever they have become conditioned to the harmful ways extreme heat or cold, air pollen, the sun's rays, wind, humidity, or smog can be underlying causes of illness. Such chronic and acute ailments, such as respiratory disorders, lung problems, heart failure, heat exhaustion, and heatstroke, may be weather related, particularly during heat waves. During excessive cold spells physicians treat many more cases of respiratory infections, namely pneumonia, bronchitis, and influenza. Surprisingly, medical research has found the "common" cold is not caused solely by people "catching" it during periods of bad weather (a sudden drop in temperature) but more likely by an infection brought on by a virus when an exposed person is in a receptive state. People experiencing fatigue, especially during winter months while working indoors close to others, are more susceptible to getting a cold from a germ-carrying colleague they may have contact with.

According to physiological studies, children tend to be less affected by hot and humid weather than adults. Older people are more lethargic, edgy, and impatient during climatic discomforts. They also seem to be less alert, slower in judgment, and less tolerant during times when they "feel" the weather.

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Due to the Weather: Ways the Elements Affect Our Lives
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Part I - Different Kinds of Weather Elements 1
  • 1 - Avalanches 3
  • 2 - Clouds 11
  • 3 - Droughts 17
  • 4 - Dust Storms 25
  • 5 - Floods 31
  • 6 - Fog 39
  • 7 - Hail 45
  • 8 - Humidity 51
  • 9 - Hurricanes/Typhoons 57
  • 10 - Ice 65
  • 11 - Lightning/Thunder 73
  • 12 - Monsoons 79
  • 13 - Mudslides 85
  • 14 - Rainfall 93
  • 15 - Snow 99
  • 16 - Sunshine 107
  • 17 - Temperatures (Cold) 113
  • 18 - Temperatures (Hot) 119
  • 19 - Tornadoes 125
  • 20 - Winds 133
  • Part II - How Weather Affects Us 141
  • 21 - Business 143
  • 22 - Clothing 149
  • 23 - Crime 153
  • 24 - Costums 159
  • 25 - Health 165
  • 26 - History 173
  • 27 - Migration 181
  • 28 - Shelter 187
  • 29 - Sports and Recreation 193
  • 30 - Transportation 203
  • Appendix - Directory of Web Site Contacts 211
  • Index 217
  • About the Author 221
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